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Beyond Aztlan

Beyond Aztlan

Ethnic Autonomy in Comparative Perspective

Mario Barrera

To succeed in America, ethnic groups have historically been required to give up their distinctive cultural identity in order to achieve economic and political parity. Mexican Americans, who have scored limited gains in their struggle for equality since the 1940s, are proving to be no exception to the rule. In this provocative volume, Mario Barrera compares the situation of Mexican Americans to that of minority groups in four other countries, and concludes that equality does not necessarily require assimilation. This unique comparative study will appeal to a wide audience—especially to students and professors of sociology, ethnic studies, political science, anthropology, and American studies.

ISBN: 978-0-268-00688-4
224 pages
Publication Year: 1990

“Barrera provides a powerful statement regarding the importance of ethnic goals within a pluralistic society even when those goals may threaten the solidarity of the modern conception of the nation state.” — International Migration Review

“This overview looks at Mexican-American politics since the 1940s, analyzes the aims of the Chicano Movement, and weighs the relative successes and failures both of that political force and of the larger society in accommodating it. A useful, accessible book.” — Books of the Southwest

P00367

Race and Class in the Southwest

A Theory of Racial Inequality

Mario Barrera

P03281

Latinos in New York

Communities in Transition, Second Edition


Edited by Sherrie Baver, Angelo Falcón, and Gabriel Haslip-Viera

P03164

Open Your Heart

Religion and Cultural Poetics of Greater Mexico

David P. Sandell

P01509

Immigration and the Border

Politics and Policy in the New Latino Century


Edited by David L. Leal and José E. Limón

Beyond Aztlan

Ethnic Autonomy in Comparative Perspective

Mario Barrera

 Beyond Aztlan: Ethnic Autonomy in Comparative Perspective
Paper Edition

To succeed in America, ethnic groups have historically been required to give up their distinctive cultural identity in order to achieve economic and political parity. Mexican Americans, who have scored limited gains in their struggle for equality since the 1940s, are proving to be no exception to the rule. In this provocative volume, Mario Barrera compares the situation of Mexican Americans to that of minority groups in four other countries, and concludes that equality does not necessarily require assimilation. This unique comparative study will appeal to a wide audience—especially to students and professors of sociology, ethnic studies, political science, anthropology, and American studies.

ISBN: 978-0-268-00688-4

224 pages

“Barrera provides a powerful statement regarding the importance of ethnic goals within a pluralistic society even when those goals may threaten the solidarity of the modern conception of the nation state.” — International Migration Review

“This overview looks at Mexican-American politics since the 1940s, analyzes the aims of the Chicano Movement, and weighs the relative successes and failures both of that political force and of the larger society in accommodating it. A useful, accessible book.” — Books of the Southwest