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Causality in Crisis?

Causality in Crisis?

Statistical Methods and the Search for Causal Knowledge in the Social Sciences

Edited by Vaughn R. McKim and Steven Turner

In 1993 prominent scholars from a variety of disciplines (social sciences, statistics, philosophy of science) gathered to debate whether causal modeling techniques old or new can really justify the drawing of causal conclusions on the basis of correlational statistical data. The resulting volume from the conference is a comprehensive and sophisticated introduction to perhaps the most important set of issues confronting social scientific researchers in the 1990’s and beyond.

ISBN: 978-0-268-00824-6
424 pages
Publication Year: 1997

“[A]n attempt to set out what the problems with contemporary statistical methods are, what solutions are being proposed, and to open up the debates about their effectiveness to a wider audience.” —Social Studies of Science

P00757

Surviving in a Material World

The Lived Experience of People in Poverty

Ronald Paul Hill

P00044

Cattle Lords and Clansmen

The Social Structure of Early Ireland

Nerys T. Patterson

Causality in Crisis?

Statistical Methods and the Search for Causal Knowledge in the Social Sciences


Edited by Vaughn R. McKim and Steven Turner

 Causality in Crisis?: Statistical Methods and the Search for Causal Knowledge in the Social Sciences
Paper Edition

In 1993 prominent scholars from a variety of disciplines (social sciences, statistics, philosophy of science) gathered to debate whether causal modeling techniques old or new can really justify the drawing of causal conclusions on the basis of correlational statistical data. The resulting volume from the conference is a comprehensive and sophisticated introduction to perhaps the most important set of issues confronting social scientific researchers in the 1990’s and beyond.

ISBN: 978-0-268-00824-6

424 pages

“[A]n attempt to set out what the problems with contemporary statistical methods are, what solutions are being proposed, and to open up the debates about their effectiveness to a wider audience.” —Social Studies of Science

Studies in Science and the Humanities from the Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values