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Creed As Symbol

The Creed As Symbol

Nicholas Ayo, C.S.C.

This book presents the Apostles’ Creed as more than a basic confession but as a symbol of the mystery of God. Ayo holds that the Apostles’ Creed is a sacred poem, an ancient psalm, holy and beautiful in its form as well as in its content. The Creed as Symbol is an ideal companion piece to any student religious text, as a parish renewal source book, or primary text for catechumens.

ISBN: 978-0-268-00771-3
196 pages
Publication Year: 1988

Nicholas Ayo is professor emeritus in the Program of Liberal Studies at the University of Notre Dame. He is the author of a number of books, including The Hail Mary: A Verbal Icon of Mary (University of Notre Dame Press, 1994).

“Father Ayo provides us with a study of the Apostles’ Creed and, to some extent, of the Nicene Creed, in both the historical meaning and the liturgical use. It’s a fascinating treatment, interesting both for clarity and brevity.” — The Priest

P00163

Hail Mary

A Verbal Icon of Mary

Nicholas Ayo, C.S.C.

P01171

Gloria Patri

The History and Theology of the Lesser Doxology

Nicholas Ayo, C.S.C.

P03308

Mary on the Eve of the Second Vatican Council


Edited by John C. Cavadini and Danielle M. Peters

P03279

Work of Love

A Theological Reconstruction of the Communion of Saints

Leonard J. DeLorenzo

P03206

Theo-Poetics

Hans Urs von Balthasar and the Risk of Art and Being

Anne M. Carpenter
Foreword by Peter J. Casarella

The Creed As Symbol

Nicholas Ayo, C.S.C.

The Creed As Symbol
Paper Edition

This book presents the Apostles’ Creed as more than a basic confession but as a symbol of the mystery of God. Ayo holds that the Apostles’ Creed is a sacred poem, an ancient psalm, holy and beautiful in its form as well as in its content. The Creed as Symbol is an ideal companion piece to any student religious text, as a parish renewal source book, or primary text for catechumens.

ISBN: 978-0-268-00771-3

196 pages

“Father Ayo provides us with a study of the Apostles’ Creed and, to some extent, of the Nicene Creed, in both the historical meaning and the liturgical use. It’s a fascinating treatment, interesting both for clarity and brevity.” — The Priest