Mobile menu

Books
Right arrow
Easter in Ordinary

Easter in Ordinary

Reflections on Human Experience and the Knowledge of God

Nicholas Lash

ISBN: 978-0-268-16076-0
0 pages
Publication Year: 1990

Nicholas Lash is Emeritus Norris-Hulse Professor of Divinity at the University of Cambridge and author of Believing Three Ways in One God, also published by the University of Notre Dame Press.

“. . . Lash critiques William James’s contention that true religious experience is limited to a few. Relying on John Henry Newman, Friedrich von Hugel, Martin Buber and, more briefly, Hegel, Kant, Schleiermacher, J.F. Fries, and Karl Rahner, and writing from a Christian perspective . . . Lash argues that mysticism should not be reduced to ‘feelings’ and that the experience of God is not something other than the general experiences had in ordinary life. While accessible to lay readers, this book would be appreciated by professional philosophers and theologians.” — Library Journal

“This complex, distilled, but deeply affecting study of William James, Newman, von Hugel, and Buber, among others, is the choice product of the believing theologian’s art. Tradition rebottled with an awareness of postmodern needs but not necessarily with the mass-market tastes in mind. Demanding, uncommon, quenching.” — Commonweal

P00025

Believing Three Ways in One God

A Reading of the Apostles’ Creed

Nicholas Lash

P01255

Theology for Pilgrims

Nicholas LashIntroduction by Fergus Kerr

P03437

Beyond East and West

John C. H. Wu
Foreword by John Wu, Jr.

P03274

I Want You to Be

On the God of Love

Tomáš Halík
Translated by Gerald Turner

P03249

Uncommon Prayer

Prayer in Everyday Experience

Michael Plekon

Easter in Ordinary

Reflections on Human Experience and the Knowledge of God

Nicholas Lash

 Easter in Ordinary: Reflections on Human Experience and the Knowledge of God
Cloth Edition
Paper Edition

ISBN: 978-0-268-16076-0

0 pages

“. . . Lash critiques William James’s contention that true religious experience is limited to a few. Relying on John Henry Newman, Friedrich von Hugel, Martin Buber and, more briefly, Hegel, Kant, Schleiermacher, J.F. Fries, and Karl Rahner, and writing from a Christian perspective . . . Lash argues that mysticism should not be reduced to ‘feelings’ and that the experience of God is not something other than the general experiences had in ordinary life. While accessible to lay readers, this book would be appreciated by professional philosophers and theologians.” — Library Journal

“This complex, distilled, but deeply affecting study of William James, Newman, von Hugel, and Buber, among others, is the choice product of the believing theologian’s art. Tradition rebottled with an awareness of postmodern needs but not necessarily with the mass-market tastes in mind. Demanding, uncommon, quenching.” — Commonweal