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Hegel

Hegel

Texts and Commentary

W. G. Hegel
Translated and Edited by Walter Kaufmann

Herbert Marcuse called the preface to Hegel’s Phenomenology “one of the greatest philosophical undertakings of all times.” This summary of Hegel’s system of philosophy is now available in English translation with commentary on facing pages. While remaining faithful to the author’s meaning, the translator has removed many encumbrances inherent in Hegel’s style.

ISBN: 978-0-268-01069-0
144 pages
Publication Year: 1977

Walter Kaufmann (1921–1980) was a German-American philosopher, translator, and poet. He served for over thirty years as a professor at Princeton University.

“[Kaufmann’s] lengthy commentary is a minor masterpiece of concise and erudite interpretation. This is a welcome departure from the lazy habit of pretending that Hegel was an obscure pedant who left some quite readable lectures on the philosophy of history. . . . To grasp what Hegel was really trying to do, one has to confront his metaphysics, and thanks to Kaufmann this an now be done even by the philosophical novice.” — The New York Review of Books

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Hegel

Texts and Commentary

W. G. Hegel
Translated and
Edited by Walter Kaufmann

 Hegel: Texts and Commentary
Paper Edition

Herbert Marcuse called the preface to Hegel’s Phenomenology “one of the greatest philosophical undertakings of all times.” This summary of Hegel’s system of philosophy is now available in English translation with commentary on facing pages. While remaining faithful to the author’s meaning, the translator has removed many encumbrances inherent in Hegel’s style.

ISBN: 978-0-268-01069-0

144 pages

“[Kaufmann’s] lengthy commentary is a minor masterpiece of concise and erudite interpretation. This is a welcome departure from the lazy habit of pretending that Hegel was an obscure pedant who left some quite readable lectures on the philosophy of history. . . . To grasp what Hegel was really trying to do, one has to confront his metaphysics, and thanks to Kaufmann this an now be done even by the philosophical novice.” — The New York Review of Books