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Idea of a University

The Idea of a University

John Henry Cardinal Newman
Edited with an introduction and notes by Martin J. Svaglic

The “Idea of a University [is] that eloquent defense of a liberal education which is perhaps the most timeless of all [Newman’s] books and certainly the one most intellectually accessible to readers of every religious faith and of none.” —from the Introduction by Martin J. Svaglic

ISBN: 978-0-268-01150-5
428 pages
Publication Year: 1982

“It is a classic; like so many classics, however, and alas, it is largely forgotten or too seldom read. This is decidedly not because it is difficult to read; it is wonderfully readable, and the reading of it will, we urge you to believe, transform the imagination of any student. In nine inter-connected essays, Newman defines the nature of the true university and the purpose of education—knowledge as an end in itself—and defends, by extolling, the liberal arts.” — American Citizen

P00129

Fifteen Sermons Preached before the University of Oxford Between A.D. 1826 and 1843

John Henry Cardinal NewmanIntroduction by Mary Katherine Tillman

P00558

Newman and Conversion

John Henry Cardinal Newman
Edited by Ian Ker

P00628

Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine

John Henry Cardinal Newman
Foreword by Ian Ker

P03200

Loss and Gain

The Story of a Convert

John Henry Newman
Edited and Introduced by Sheridan Gilley

P03089

Tracts for the Times

John Henry Cardinal Newman with an Introduction and Notes by James Tolhurst

The Idea of a University

John Henry Cardinal Newman
Edited with an introduction and notes by Martin J. Svaglic

The Idea of a University
Paper Edition

The “Idea of a University [is] that eloquent defense of a liberal education which is perhaps the most timeless of all [Newman’s] books and certainly the one most intellectually accessible to readers of every religious faith and of none.” —from the Introduction by Martin J. Svaglic

ISBN: 978-0-268-01150-5

428 pages

“It is a classic; like so many classics, however, and alas, it is largely forgotten or too seldom read. This is decidedly not because it is difficult to read; it is wonderfully readable, and the reading of it will, we urge you to believe, transform the imagination of any student. In nine inter-connected essays, Newman defines the nature of the true university and the purpose of education—knowledge as an end in itself—and defends, by extolling, the liberal arts.” — American Citizen