Mobile menu

Books
Right arrow
Images of Hope

Images of Hope

Imagination as Healer of the Hopeless

William F. Lynch, S.J.

This is a book about hope. Part 1 is a compact but necessarily limited attempt to describe the actual structure and concrete forms of hope and hopelessness; Part 2 is an exploration of a psychology of hope, the beginning of an investigation of what psychic forms and dynamisms move most toward hope and against hopelessness; and Part 3 is an analogous effort to suggest the outlines of a metaphysics of hope.

ISBN: 978-0-268-00536-8
320 pages
Publication Year: 1974

The Reverend William F. Lynch (1931–2003) was the author of nine books, including The Integrating Mind: An Exploration into Western Thought and The Image Industries.

“For those directly involved with the care of the mentally ill, Father Lynch offers many valid insights, including the fact that honest self-disclosure can be infinitely helpful to the patient who is mesmerized by a perfectionistic or independence ideal carried to its extreme. It is a thoughtful book from which emanates concern.” — Journal of Religion and Health

“Images of Hope, issued out of a harrowing personal experience of severe mental breakdown, [is] still a classic in the field of psychological healing. [The Reverend William F.] Lynch knew what it meant to rise from the dead.” — Commonweal

“While he is learned enough about the literature my field (psychiatry) has accumulated during its brief history, scholarship alone cannot account for his remarkable effectiveness in this volume. So, I must begin with a statement which because of its simplicity is difficult to make cleanly: Father Lynch is genuinely devoted to our calling. In fact, I suspect he is more devoted than many of its practitioners who tend understandably to be more quickly discouraged by its deficiencies. In these days of fashionable get-togethers between religion and psychiatry, I am impelled to add that he has no wish to proselytize or be proselytized. In other words, he is the rarest of human beings—the outside who can speak as a friend.” — American Journal of Psychiatry

P01012

Character Psychology and Character Education


Edited by Daniel K. Lapsley and F. Clark Power

P00635

Freud and Psychoanalysis

W. W. Meissner, S.J., M.D.Preface by Ernest Daniel Carrere

Images of Hope

Imagination as Healer of the Hopeless

William F. Lynch, S.J.

 Images of Hope: Imagination as Healer of the Hopeless
Cloth Edition
Paper Edition

This is a book about hope. Part 1 is a compact but necessarily limited attempt to describe the actual structure and concrete forms of hope and hopelessness; Part 2 is an exploration of a psychology of hope, the beginning of an investigation of what psychic forms and dynamisms move most toward hope and against hopelessness; and Part 3 is an analogous effort to suggest the outlines of a metaphysics of hope.

ISBN: 978-0-268-00536-8

320 pages

“For those directly involved with the care of the mentally ill, Father Lynch offers many valid insights, including the fact that honest self-disclosure can be infinitely helpful to the patient who is mesmerized by a perfectionistic or independence ideal carried to its extreme. It is a thoughtful book from which emanates concern.” — Journal of Religion and Health

“Images of Hope, issued out of a harrowing personal experience of severe mental breakdown, [is] still a classic in the field of psychological healing. [The Reverend William F.] Lynch knew what it meant to rise from the dead.” — Commonweal

“While he is learned enough about the literature my field (psychiatry) has accumulated during its brief history, scholarship alone cannot account for his remarkable effectiveness in this volume. So, I must begin with a statement which because of its simplicity is difficult to make cleanly: Father Lynch is genuinely devoted to our calling. In fact, I suspect he is more devoted than many of its practitioners who tend understandably to be more quickly discouraged by its deficiencies. In these days of fashionable get-togethers between religion and psychiatry, I am impelled to add that he has no wish to proselytize or be proselytized. In other words, he is the rarest of human beings—the outside who can speak as a friend.” — American Journal of Psychiatry