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Latino Ethnic Consciousness

Latino Ethnic Consciousness

The Case of Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans in Chicago

Felix M. Padilla

Focusing on Mexican-American and Puerto Rican populations in Chicago, Latino Ethnic Consciousness documents the development of the a collective Hispanic or Latino ethnic identity, distinct and separate from the national and cultural affiliations of Spanish-speaking groups. Author Felix Padilla explores the internal dynamics and external conditions which have prompted this move past individual group boundaries to a broader ethnic identity.

According to Padilla, the Latino ethnic identity develops from the cultural and structural similarities of two or more Spanish-speaking groups and often in response to common experiences of social inequality. In that ethnic identities have, to a large extent, been encouraged by the division of the labor market in America’s industrial society, he argues that the Latino consciousness represents a situational ethnic identity which functions according to the needs of the groups. He describes how such conditions as poverty and racial discrimination have necessitated the assertion of a broader Latino ethnic consciousness and behavior, often more successful in social action than individual cultural or national associations.

In case studies from the early 70s, Padilla examines Affirmative Action, the Spanish Coalition for Jobs—spurred by activist Hector Franco—and the Latino Institute, and their influence on the growth of Latino solidarity and mobilization in Chicago. In refining the concept of Latino and Hispanic and establishing its significance in society, Latino Ethnic Consciousness serves as an analytic framework for further study of ethnic change in America.

 
 

ISBN: 978-0-268-01275-5
198 pages
Publication Year: 1985

Felix M. Padilla was the Director for the Center for Latino and Latin American Affairs at Northern Illinois University.

“A most enlightening exposition of the social, political, and economic factors that shape the development of ethnic consciousness among any group.” — Choice

“Latino Ethnic Consciousness is an important contribution to the study of ethnicity. Padilla demonstrates how ethnicity and ethnic identity are dynamic forces that are constantly evolving and responsive to changes in structural conditions.” — Mexican Studies/Estudios Mexicanos

“Felix M. Padilla’s contribution to the growing body of literature on Latino/Hispanic identity in the United States represents a significant departure from the way most social scientists have approached their analysis of ethnic identity and consciousness. On his way to putting together a conceptual framework for supporting his thesis of an emerging Latino ethnic identity and consciousness, Padilla provides a substantial in-depth analysis of the Mexican American and Puerto Rican community-based organization in Chicago during the early 1970s.” —_Explorations in Sights and Sounds_

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Critical Essays

Paul Spickardwith contributions by Jeffrey Moniz and Ingrid Dineen-Wimberly

P03121

Jalos, USA

Transnational Community and Identity

Alfredo Mirandé

P00916

Racial Thinking in the United States

Uncompleted Independence


Edited by Paul Spickard and G. Reginald Daniel

Latino Ethnic Consciousness

The Case of Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans in Chicago

Felix M. Padilla

 Latino Ethnic Consciousness: The Case of Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans in Chicago
Paper Edition

Focusing on Mexican-American and Puerto Rican populations in Chicago, Latino Ethnic Consciousness documents the development of the a collective Hispanic or Latino ethnic identity, distinct and separate from the national and cultural affiliations of Spanish-speaking groups. Author Felix Padilla explores the internal dynamics and external conditions which have prompted this move past individual group boundaries to a broader ethnic identity.

According to Padilla, the Latino ethnic identity develops from the cultural and structural similarities of two or more Spanish-speaking groups and often in response to common experiences of social inequality. In that ethnic identities have, to a large extent, been encouraged by the division of the labor market in America’s industrial society, he argues that the Latino consciousness represents a situational ethnic identity which functions according to the needs of the groups. He describes how such conditions as poverty and racial discrimination have necessitated the assertion of a broader Latino ethnic consciousness and behavior, often more successful in social action than individual cultural or national associations.

In case studies from the early 70s, Padilla examines Affirmative Action, the Spanish Coalition for Jobs—spurred by activist Hector Franco—and the Latino Institute, and their influence on the growth of Latino solidarity and mobilization in Chicago. In refining the concept of Latino and Hispanic and establishing its significance in society, Latino Ethnic Consciousness serves as an analytic framework for further study of ethnic change in America.

 
 

ISBN: 978-0-268-01275-5

198 pages

“A most enlightening exposition of the social, political, and economic factors that shape the development of ethnic consciousness among any group.” — Choice

“Latino Ethnic Consciousness is an important contribution to the study of ethnicity. Padilla demonstrates how ethnicity and ethnic identity are dynamic forces that are constantly evolving and responsive to changes in structural conditions.” — Mexican Studies/Estudios Mexicanos

“Felix M. Padilla’s contribution to the growing body of literature on Latino/Hispanic identity in the United States represents a significant departure from the way most social scientists have approached their analysis of ethnic identity and consciousness. On his way to putting together a conceptual framework for supporting his thesis of an emerging Latino ethnic identity and consciousness, Padilla provides a substantial in-depth analysis of the Mexican American and Puerto Rican community-based organization in Chicago during the early 1970s.” —_Explorations in Sights and Sounds_