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Medicine and the Marketplace

P00263
P00263
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Awards

Winner, 1999 Choice Outstanding Academic Book Award

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Medicine and the Marketplace

The Moral Dimensions of Managed Care

Kenman L. Wong

Kenman L. Wong’s timely book addresses issues raised by the new intersections of business and medicine with an ethical assessment of emerging health care arrangements. By focusing on organizational ethics, he offers an integrative framework that seeks to balance patient, societal, and corporate interests. To avoid overly simplistic solutions, Wong compares managed care, traditional fee-for-service arrangements, and other proposed health care reform options such as rationing programs and medical savings accounts, and offers an analysis of the ethical issues based upon principles of fairness.

“This is an engaging and important volume. Wong takes seriously medical ethics and business ethics by exploring how organizational norms can be appropriately applied to managed care. The book recognizes the extent to which managed care for better or worse marks a moral watershed in the identity of the health professions: it offers reasons why a reformulated business model may do better than a traditional medical model in candidly indicating the balance between legitimate self-interests and caring for the patient. This is a book that no one in bioethics or health care policy should fail to read.” — H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr., Ph.D., M.D., Professor at Baylor College of Medicine

“Professor Wong has made a first-rate contribution to the discussion of the intersection of business and medicine. This work will be a standard in the increasingly complex field for some time to come.”
Scott B. Rae, Ph.D., Professor of Biblical Studies and Christian Ethics, Talbot School of Theology, Biola University

ISBN: 978-0-268-03455-9
232 pages
Publication Year: 1998

Kenman L. Wong is professor of business ethics at Seattle Pacific University. He is co-author of Beyond Integrity: A Judeo-Christian Approach to Business Ethics (1996).

“The tension between maximizing profits and caring for patients has been heightened by the growing prevalence of managed care systems. The author looks at these tensions with respect to organizational ethics and compares for-profit and not-for-profit managed care systems with fee-for-service, rationing, and medical savings account programs. An integration of medical, business, and organizational ethics, with an emphasis on Rawlsian justice, gives a value framework for ethical decision making in managed care.” — The Hastings Center Report

“Wong offers a very comprehensive discussion of what managed care represents to the U.S. health care system in terms of quality and quantity of patient care. Well-researched viewpoints arguing in favor of and against managed care are offered. . . . An excellent book, which actually frames some solutions for the chaotic health care delivery system the U.S. is currently facing.” – Choice

“Wong’s is a comprehensive analysis of the new ethical challenges raised by the concept of managed health care. Society is left to ask how physicians can properly honor their obligations to patients when the managed care organizations that employ them have an obligation to shareholders.” — Abstracts of Public Administration, Development, and Environment

“He (Wong) offers compelling reasons for health-care systems to adopt a capitalist business model in order to manage responsibly their delivery of medical care.” — Theological Studies

“Wong’s book is a critical and important first step in the debate on managed care and the discussion of business ethics in health care. It should be read by anyone interested in medical ethics.” — Journal of Medical Ethics

“Medicine and the Marketplace is thus a valuable contribution to the literature. Even if it does not provide fresh, startling insights, the book brings together a host of important ideas in the literature of business ethics, and makes them readily available to audiences who would not otherwise have them so easily, coherently, and powerfully available.” — Medical Humanities Review

“[A]n interesting attempt to group together supporters of various positions according to their location on two continua — the degree to which medical care should be managed by third parties external to the patient–physician relationship, and the degree to which accountability for cost and quality should rest with markets or individual professionals. It succeeds in . . . throwing light on the stance taken by different groups on managed care." — Social Science and Medicine

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Medicine and the Marketplace

The Moral Dimensions of Managed Care

Kenman L. Wong

 Medicine and the Marketplace: The Moral Dimensions of Managed Care
Paper Edition

Kenman L. Wong’s timely book addresses issues raised by the new intersections of business and medicine with an ethical assessment of emerging health care arrangements. By focusing on organizational ethics, he offers an integrative framework that seeks to balance patient, societal, and corporate interests. To avoid overly simplistic solutions, Wong compares managed care, traditional fee-for-service arrangements, and other proposed health care reform options such as rationing programs and medical savings accounts, and offers an analysis of the ethical issues based upon principles of fairness.

“This is an engaging and important volume. Wong takes seriously medical ethics and business ethics by exploring how organizational norms can be appropriately applied to managed care. The book recognizes the extent to which managed care for better or worse marks a moral watershed in the identity of the health professions: it offers reasons why a reformulated business model may do better than a traditional medical model in candidly indicating the balance between legitimate self-interests and caring for the patient. This is a book that no one in bioethics or health care policy should fail to read.” — H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr., Ph.D., M.D., Professor at Baylor College of Medicine

“Professor Wong has made a first-rate contribution to the discussion of the intersection of business and medicine. This work will be a standard in the increasingly complex field for some time to come.”
Scott B. Rae, Ph.D., Professor of Biblical Studies and Christian Ethics, Talbot School of Theology, Biola University

ISBN: 978-0-268-03455-9

232 pages

“The tension between maximizing profits and caring for patients has been heightened by the growing prevalence of managed care systems. The author looks at these tensions with respect to organizational ethics and compares for-profit and not-for-profit managed care systems with fee-for-service, rationing, and medical savings account programs. An integration of medical, business, and organizational ethics, with an emphasis on Rawlsian justice, gives a value framework for ethical decision making in managed care.” — The Hastings Center Report

“Wong offers a very comprehensive discussion of what managed care represents to the U.S. health care system in terms of quality and quantity of patient care. Well-researched viewpoints arguing in favor of and against managed care are offered. . . . An excellent book, which actually frames some solutions for the chaotic health care delivery system the U.S. is currently facing.” – Choice

“Wong’s is a comprehensive analysis of the new ethical challenges raised by the concept of managed health care. Society is left to ask how physicians can properly honor their obligations to patients when the managed care organizations that employ them have an obligation to shareholders.” — Abstracts of Public Administration, Development, and Environment

“He (Wong) offers compelling reasons for health-care systems to adopt a capitalist business model in order to manage responsibly their delivery of medical care.” — Theological Studies

“Wong’s book is a critical and important first step in the debate on managed care and the discussion of business ethics in health care. It should be read by anyone interested in medical ethics.” — Journal of Medical Ethics

“Medicine and the Marketplace is thus a valuable contribution to the literature. Even if it does not provide fresh, startling insights, the book brings together a host of important ideas in the literature of business ethics, and makes them readily available to audiences who would not otherwise have them so easily, coherently, and powerfully available.” — Medical Humanities Review

“[A]n interesting attempt to group together supporters of various positions according to their location on two continua — the degree to which medical care should be managed by third parties external to the patient–physician relationship, and the degree to which accountability for cost and quality should rest with markets or individual professionals. It succeeds in . . . throwing light on the stance taken by different groups on managed care." — Social Science and Medicine

Winner, 1999 Choice Outstanding Academic Book Award