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Race and Class in the Southwest

Race and Class in the Southwest

A Theory of Racial Inequality

Mario Barrera

Focusing on the economic foundations of inequality as they have affected Chicanos in the Southwest from the Mexican-American War to the present, the author develops his theory as a synthesis of class and colonial analyses.

ISBN: 978-0-268-04857-0
274 pages
Publication Year: 1979

Mario Barrera is professor emeritus of Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of Beyond Aztlan, which is also published by the University of Notre Dame Press, and co-producer of the documentary film Chicano Park.

“Thoroughly researched, well-written and persuasively argued, this book is a must for those who would fully understand the complex position of the Chicano in U.S. society.” — Choice

“Barrera has attempted the important task of developing a theory of racial inequality relevant beyond its particular application to the Chicano experience. Any serious student of race relations and stratification in the U.S. will have to contend with his analysis.” — Contemporary Sociology

“. . . an important contribution to the field. Barrera has successfully harnessed historical analysis, social criticism, and an aggressive empiricism to an analysis of a major moral, political, and public policy issue.” — Journal of Economic History

“Barrera’s study is a pioneering venture into a theoretical exploration of the Chicano experience. It is a book to be reckoned with by all students of ethnicity in the United States.” — New Mexico Historical Review

“This is a tightly organized, well-written work that provides a theoretical backdrop to Southwestern economic history.” — Library Journal

“Barrera has provided us with a work that is carefully documented, well researched, and thoroughly challenging. Reading this book is an experience no serious student in the field can afford to miss.” — Sociology: Reviews of New Books

P00026

Beyond Aztlan

Ethnic Autonomy in Comparative Perspective

Mario Barrera

P03281

Latinos in New York

Communities in Transition, Second Edition


Edited by Sherrie Baver, Angelo Falcón, and Gabriel Haslip-Viera

P03164

Open Your Heart

Religion and Cultural Poetics of Greater Mexico

David P. Sandell

P01509

Immigration and the Border

Politics and Policy in the New Latino Century


Edited by David L. Leal and José E. Limón

Race and Class in the Southwest

A Theory of Racial Inequality

Mario Barrera

 Race and Class in the Southwest: A Theory of Racial Inequality
Cloth Edition
Paper Edition

Focusing on the economic foundations of inequality as they have affected Chicanos in the Southwest from the Mexican-American War to the present, the author develops his theory as a synthesis of class and colonial analyses.

ISBN: 978-0-268-04857-0

274 pages

“Thoroughly researched, well-written and persuasively argued, this book is a must for those who would fully understand the complex position of the Chicano in U.S. society.” — Choice

“Barrera has attempted the important task of developing a theory of racial inequality relevant beyond its particular application to the Chicano experience. Any serious student of race relations and stratification in the U.S. will have to contend with his analysis.” — Contemporary Sociology

“. . . an important contribution to the field. Barrera has successfully harnessed historical analysis, social criticism, and an aggressive empiricism to an analysis of a major moral, political, and public policy issue.” — Journal of Economic History

“Barrera’s study is a pioneering venture into a theoretical exploration of the Chicano experience. It is a book to be reckoned with by all students of ethnicity in the United States.” — New Mexico Historical Review

“This is a tightly organized, well-written work that provides a theoretical backdrop to Southwestern economic history.” — Library Journal

“Barrera has provided us with a work that is carefully documented, well researched, and thoroughly challenging. Reading this book is an experience no serious student in the field can afford to miss.” — Sociology: Reviews of New Books