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Seven Deadly Sins Today

The Seven Deadly Sins Today

Henry Fairlie

Sin, like death, is an unassailable fact of life. It is also one of the last great taboos for public debate. In this compelling book, the Henry Fairlie shows that it is possible and necessary to talk about sin in ways that enrich our societies and our personal lives. Fairlie relates these ancient sins to the central issues of contemporary life: liberal vs. conservative politics, discrimination, pornography, abortion, the vistas of modern science, and especially the pop-psychologies that confirm the narcissism of our age.

ISBN: 978-0-268-01698-2
224 pages
Publication Year: 1978

The late Henry Fairlie, a native of Great Britain, was a frequent contributor to The New Republic and The Washington Post. Among his many acclaimed books are The Spoiled Child of the Western World and The Kennedy Promise.

“Depressingly accurate about many of our malaises. . . . [Fairlie] fits the ancient sin to the contemporary condition.” — The New York Times Book Review

“A biting critique of the hocum, the sleazy, self-deluding arrogance of much pop culture.” — The Christian Century

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The Seven Deadly Sins Today

Henry Fairlie

The Seven Deadly Sins Today
Paper Edition

Sin, like death, is an unassailable fact of life. It is also one of the last great taboos for public debate. In this compelling book, the Henry Fairlie shows that it is possible and necessary to talk about sin in ways that enrich our societies and our personal lives. Fairlie relates these ancient sins to the central issues of contemporary life: liberal vs. conservative politics, discrimination, pornography, abortion, the vistas of modern science, and especially the pop-psychologies that confirm the narcissism of our age.

ISBN: 978-0-268-01698-2

224 pages

“Depressingly accurate about many of our malaises. . . . [Fairlie] fits the ancient sin to the contemporary condition.” — The New York Times Book Review

“A biting critique of the hocum, the sleazy, self-deluding arrogance of much pop culture.” — The Christian Century