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Way of All the Earth

The Way of All the Earth

Experiments in Truth and Religion

John S. Dunne

“The holy man of our time, it seems, is not a figure like Gotama or Jesus or Mohammed, a man who could found a world religion, but a figure like Gandhi, a man who passes over by sympathetic understanding from his own religion to other religions and comes back again with new insight to his own. Passing over and coming back, it seems, is the spiritual adventure of our time. It is the adventure I want to undertake and describe in this book.” — from the Preface

“There is not another thinker—religious or secular—like Dunne. He brings to a too literal age the seer’s gift for uncovering the connections between our existing approaches to knowledge.” — Martin Marty

In The Way of All the Earth, John Dunne offers reflections on the common experiences of man as they are revealed in the writings of the Hindu-Buddhist, Islamic, and Christian traditions. In this inter-religious dialogue, John Dunne shifts his standpoint to reach a sympathetic understanding of the essential message of the Eastern religions and then returns with new insight into Christianity.

ISBN: 978-0-268-01928-0
256 pages
Publication Year: 1978

John S. Dunne (1930–2013) was the John A. O’Brien Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame and the author of over twenty books, including Eternal Consciousness, recipient of the 2013 First Place Catholic Press Association Book Award for Spirituality, The Circle Dance of Time, and his memoir, A Journey with God in Time, all published by the University of Notre Dame Press.

“[This book is] Dunne’s sensitive exploration of ‘passing over,’ the process whereby an individual crosses sympathetically from his own religion to another and returns with increased understanding of his personal faith. Dunne’s own literary odyssey leads him to conclude that all religions are based on common experiences. The need for ‘passing over’ is even more vital now than when Dunne wrote the book in 1972.” — The Christian Century

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John C. H. Wu
Foreword by John Wu, Jr.

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On the God of Love

Tomáš Halík
Translated by Gerald Turner

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Uncommon Prayer

Prayer in Everyday Experience

Michael Plekon

The Way of All the Earth

Experiments in Truth and Religion

John S. Dunne

The Way of All the Earth: Experiments in Truth and Religion
Paper Edition

“The holy man of our time, it seems, is not a figure like Gotama or Jesus or Mohammed, a man who could found a world religion, but a figure like Gandhi, a man who passes over by sympathetic understanding from his own religion to other religions and comes back again with new insight to his own. Passing over and coming back, it seems, is the spiritual adventure of our time. It is the adventure I want to undertake and describe in this book.” — from the Preface

“There is not another thinker—religious or secular—like Dunne. He brings to a too literal age the seer’s gift for uncovering the connections between our existing approaches to knowledge.” — Martin Marty

In The Way of All the Earth, John Dunne offers reflections on the common experiences of man as they are revealed in the writings of the Hindu-Buddhist, Islamic, and Christian traditions. In this inter-religious dialogue, John Dunne shifts his standpoint to reach a sympathetic understanding of the essential message of the Eastern religions and then returns with new insight into Christianity.

ISBN: 978-0-268-01928-0

256 pages

“[This book is] Dunne’s sensitive exploration of ‘passing over,’ the process whereby an individual crosses sympathetically from his own religion to another and returns with increased understanding of his personal faith. Dunne’s own literary odyssey leads him to conclude that all religions are based on common experiences. The need for ‘passing over’ is even more vital now than when Dunne wrote the book in 1972.” — The Christian Century