Mobile menu

Books
Right arrow
Towards a Better Understanding of History

Towards a Better Understanding of History

Bernard Norling

“History,” writes Bernard Norling, “is not a series of unconnected episodes, all about equally important or equally useless, each embellished with a chapter title, and all then assembled in a book. It is a seamless garment, each part of which is related to all the others. It should be studied as such: studied with the object of understanding how civilizations change and why; how societies differ in many ways yet usually have to face the same kinds of problems; how innumerable ideas, events, and institutions from the past have made our present world what it is.”

In this eminently practical book, Professor Norling provides the beginning student of history with a basic orientation towards the subject. He explains why the study of history is worthwhile, discusses the fundamental concepts and methods involved, and shows the student how to start doing historical research. Yet the book is not an abstract treatise, for Professor Norling constantly illustrates what he has to say about history with fascinating and pertinent examples from history. In so doing he truly shows how the events of the past make up that “seamless web” that in time includes us all.

ISBN: 978-0-268-00284-8
160 pages
Publication Year: 1988

P03110

Enlightenment and Catholicism in Europe

A Transnational History


Edited by Jeffrey D. Burson and Ulrich L. Lehner

P03065

Minding the Modern

Human Agency, Intellectual Traditions, and Responsible Knowledge

Thomas Pfau

P01410

Confessing History

Explorations in Christian Faith and the Historian’s Vocation


Edited by John Fea, Jay Green, and Eric Miller

Towards a Better Understanding of History

Bernard Norling

 Towards a Better Understanding of History
Paper Edition

“History,” writes Bernard Norling, “is not a series of unconnected episodes, all about equally important or equally useless, each embellished with a chapter title, and all then assembled in a book. It is a seamless garment, each part of which is related to all the others. It should be studied as such: studied with the object of understanding how civilizations change and why; how societies differ in many ways yet usually have to face the same kinds of problems; how innumerable ideas, events, and institutions from the past have made our present world what it is.”

In this eminently practical book, Professor Norling provides the beginning student of history with a basic orientation towards the subject. He explains why the study of history is worthwhile, discusses the fundamental concepts and methods involved, and shows the student how to start doing historical research. Yet the book is not an abstract treatise, for Professor Norling constantly illustrates what he has to say about history with fascinating and pertinent examples from history. In so doing he truly shows how the events of the past make up that “seamless web” that in time includes us all.

ISBN: 978-0-268-00284-8

160 pages