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Treatise on the Virtues

Treatise on the Virtues

Thomas Aquinas
Translated by John A. Oesterle

In his Treatise on the Virtues, Aquinas discusses the character and function of habit; the essence, subject, cause, and meaning of virtue; and the separate intellectual, moral, cardinal, and theological virtues. His work constitutes one of the most thorough and incisive accounts of virtue in the history of Christian philosophy. John Oesterle’s accurate and elegant translation makes this enduring work readily accessible to the modern reader.

ISBN: 978-0-268-01855-9
176 pages
Publication Year: 1984

The late John A. Oesterle was the author of Logic: The Art of Defining and Reasoning and the translator of Treatise on Happiness, also published by the University of Notre Dame Press.

“At the heart of this treatise are the subtle but crucial distinctions St. Thomas draws among the intellect and will, and the intellectual, moral, and theological virtues—establishing at the same time their interdependence. The discussion of prudence, as the bridge between the intellectual and moral virtues, is one of the classic accomplishments of Western thought.” — Faith & Reason

P00307

On Faith

Summa Theologiae 2-2, qq. 1–16 of St. Thomas Aquinas

Thomas Aquinas
Translated with an Introduction by Mark D. Jordan

P00423

Summa Contra Gentiles, 3:II

Book 3: Providence, Part II

Thomas Aquinas
Translated by Vernon J. Bourke

P00424

Summa Contra Gentiles, 3:I

Book 3: Providence Part I

Thomas Aquinas

P00307

On Faith

Summa Theologiae 2-2, qq. 1–16 of St. Thomas Aquinas

Thomas Aquinas
Translated with an Introduction by Mark D. Jordan

P03156

Logica, or Summa Lamberti

Lambert of Auxerre;
Translated with notes and introduction by Thomas S. Maloney

P03087

Abelard in Four Dimensions

A Twelfth-Century Philosopher in His Context and Ours

John Marenbon

Treatise on the Virtues

Thomas Aquinas
Translated by John A. Oesterle

 Treatise on the Virtues
Paper Edition

In his Treatise on the Virtues, Aquinas discusses the character and function of habit; the essence, subject, cause, and meaning of virtue; and the separate intellectual, moral, cardinal, and theological virtues. His work constitutes one of the most thorough and incisive accounts of virtue in the history of Christian philosophy. John Oesterle’s accurate and elegant translation makes this enduring work readily accessible to the modern reader.

ISBN: 978-0-268-01855-9

176 pages

“At the heart of this treatise are the subtle but crucial distinctions St. Thomas draws among the intellect and will, and the intellectual, moral, and theological virtues—establishing at the same time their interdependence. The discussion of prudence, as the bridge between the intellectual and moral virtues, is one of the classic accomplishments of Western thought.” — Faith & Reason