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Whose Justice? Which Rationality?

Whose Justice? Which Rationality?

Alasdair MacIntyre

Whose Justice? Which Rationality?, the sequel to After Virtue, is a persuasive argument of there not being rationality that is not the rationality of some tradition. MacIntyre examines the problems presented by the existence of rival traditions of inquiry in the cases of four major philosophers: Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, and Hume.

ISBN: 978-0-268-01944-0
432 pages
Publication Year: 1988

Alasdair MacIntyre is the Rev. John A. O’Brien Senior Research Professor of Philosophy at the University of Notre Dame. He is the author of numerous books, including Three Rival Versions of Moral Enquiry: Encyclopaedia, Genealogy, and Tradition, also published by the University of Notre Dame Press.

“It is a step in the right direction, not of returning to some Catholic version of fundamentalist bibliotary, but of reading a Christian theologian and philosopher whose immense wisdom repays careful study by Christians and non-Christians alike.” — New Oxford Review

“MacIntyre is widely informed and his story of developments in the traditions that he identifies is learned, interesting, and notably well-written” — London Review of Books

“Alastair MacIntyre has done it again. Here [he] delivers on his promise in After Virtue to develop an account of rationality and justice that is tradition specific. . . . What is so remarkable about MacIntyre’s achievement is his ability to combine close historical analysis with philosophical argumentation while never losing his narrative line. . . . His analysis illumines our situation in an extraordinary manner.” — Commonweal

“MacIntyre is a master of the history of ideas. . . . [He] helps us to understand why so many people are stymied today in articulating beliefs that underlie their traditions of inquiry, practice, and public discourse.” — Commentary

“[MacIntyre’s] diagnosis of what ails recent moral philosophy is brilliant.” — Wilson Quarterly

“MacIntyre’s rich historical exposition displays all the erudition and philosophical subtlety that his readers have come to expect from his work. . . . there is much to admire in MacIntyre’s unflinching indictment of liberal modernity.” — The New Criterion

P00008

Against the Self-Images of the Age

Essays on Ideology and Philosophy

Alasdair MacIntyre

P00179

Hume's Ethical Writings

Selections from David Hume


Edited by Alasdair MacIntyre

P00260

Marxism and Christianity

Alasdair MacIntyre

P03287

Human Existence and Transcendence

Jean Wahl
Translated and
Edited by William C. Hackett
Foreword by Kevin Hart

P03259

Debating Medieval Natural Law

A Survey

Riccardo Saccenti

P03246

Problem of Evil

Selected Readings, Second Edition


Edited by Michael L. Peterson

Whose Justice? Which Rationality?

Alasdair MacIntyre

 Whose Justice? Which Rationality?
Paper Edition

Whose Justice? Which Rationality?, the sequel to After Virtue, is a persuasive argument of there not being rationality that is not the rationality of some tradition. MacIntyre examines the problems presented by the existence of rival traditions of inquiry in the cases of four major philosophers: Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, and Hume.

ISBN: 978-0-268-01944-0

432 pages

“It is a step in the right direction, not of returning to some Catholic version of fundamentalist bibliotary, but of reading a Christian theologian and philosopher whose immense wisdom repays careful study by Christians and non-Christians alike.” — New Oxford Review

“MacIntyre is widely informed and his story of developments in the traditions that he identifies is learned, interesting, and notably well-written” — London Review of Books

“Alastair MacIntyre has done it again. Here [he] delivers on his promise in After Virtue to develop an account of rationality and justice that is tradition specific. . . . What is so remarkable about MacIntyre’s achievement is his ability to combine close historical analysis with philosophical argumentation while never losing his narrative line. . . . His analysis illumines our situation in an extraordinary manner.” — Commonweal

“MacIntyre is a master of the history of ideas. . . . [He] helps us to understand why so many people are stymied today in articulating beliefs that underlie their traditions of inquiry, practice, and public discourse.” — Commentary

“[MacIntyre’s] diagnosis of what ails recent moral philosophy is brilliant.” — Wilson Quarterly

“MacIntyre’s rich historical exposition displays all the erudition and philosophical subtlety that his readers have come to expect from his work. . . . there is much to admire in MacIntyre’s unflinching indictment of liberal modernity.” — The New Criterion