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Interruptions

Interruptions

Mysticism, Politics, and Theology in the Work of Johann Baptist Metz

J. Matthew Ashley

“This text . . . presents a comprehensive look at the theological development of Metz, and in particular examines closely Metz’s shift from Rahnerian transcendental thought to the political theology that has marked his major contributions, while arguing that Metz has stayed in essential continuity with Rahner. At a second and more important level, the work takes us into a discussion of the relationships between spirituality and theology. This time, Metz is viewed as a man who has struggled throughout his life to find a way to blend prayer and theology and has discovered it finally in his sustained attention to suffering. In his concluding chapter Ashley locates the differences between Rahner and Metz in the distinct spiritualities that influence each. From Metz’s perspective, Rahner’s mysticism is too individualistic. The political or prophetic dimension is lacking. This extremely well-written work is commended to all with an interest in Rahner, Metz, or the interrelations of spirituality and theology.” —Religious Studies Review

ISBN: 978-0-268-01195-6
312 pages
Publication Year: 1998

J. Matthew Ashley is associate professor of systematic theology at the University of Notre Dame.

“This text provides the most comprehensive systematization of the theology of Johann Baptist Metz available in English. While the book is welcome enough for that, it offers much more. Ashley’s analysis of Metz’s theological career leads him to a fresh perspective on the much discussed question of the relationship between Metz’s theology and that of Karl Rahner.” —New Theology Review

“Those who have studied closely the developments in Metz’s often puzzling theological project will recognize by the very title of this book that Ashley has a sure command of the material. In writing the first comprehensive survey of Metz’s entire career, Ashley not only tracks the concept of interruption in the method and content of Metz’s theology but also applies it to Metz’s own life. Ashley’s significant contribution is to argue for the continuity in Metz’s thought as he moved from writing transcendental Thomist anthropology to creating and developing a political theology to, finally, articulating Christian praxis as Leiden an Gott, ‘suffering unto God.’” —Theological Studies

“[Ashley] offers a critical resource for wider interdisciplinary conversations about the relationships between theology and spirituality and the mystical-political structure of Christian faith-praxis.” —Anglican Theological Review

“. . . One of the finest theological monographs . . . Ashley’s exposition of the development of Metz’s thought is one of the best, perhaps even the best, available in English.” —Journal of Religion

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Interruptions

Mysticism, Politics, and Theology in the Work of Johann Baptist Metz

J. Matthew Ashley

 Interruptions: Mysticism, Politics, and Theology in the Work of Johann Baptist Metz
Paper Edition

“This text . . . presents a comprehensive look at the theological development of Metz, and in particular examines closely Metz’s shift from Rahnerian transcendental thought to the political theology that has marked his major contributions, while arguing that Metz has stayed in essential continuity with Rahner. At a second and more important level, the work takes us into a discussion of the relationships between spirituality and theology. This time, Metz is viewed as a man who has struggled throughout his life to find a way to blend prayer and theology and has discovered it finally in his sustained attention to suffering. In his concluding chapter Ashley locates the differences between Rahner and Metz in the distinct spiritualities that influence each. From Metz’s perspective, Rahner’s mysticism is too individualistic. The political or prophetic dimension is lacking. This extremely well-written work is commended to all with an interest in Rahner, Metz, or the interrelations of spirituality and theology.” —Religious Studies Review

ISBN: 978-0-268-01195-6

312 pages

“This text provides the most comprehensive systematization of the theology of Johann Baptist Metz available in English. While the book is welcome enough for that, it offers much more. Ashley’s analysis of Metz’s theological career leads him to a fresh perspective on the much discussed question of the relationship between Metz’s theology and that of Karl Rahner.” —New Theology Review

“Those who have studied closely the developments in Metz’s often puzzling theological project will recognize by the very title of this book that Ashley has a sure command of the material. In writing the first comprehensive survey of Metz’s entire career, Ashley not only tracks the concept of interruption in the method and content of Metz’s theology but also applies it to Metz’s own life. Ashley’s significant contribution is to argue for the continuity in Metz’s thought as he moved from writing transcendental Thomist anthropology to creating and developing a political theology to, finally, articulating Christian praxis as Leiden an Gott, ‘suffering unto God.’” —Theological Studies

“[Ashley] offers a critical resource for wider interdisciplinary conversations about the relationships between theology and spirituality and the mystical-political structure of Christian faith-praxis.” —Anglican Theological Review

“. . . One of the finest theological monographs . . . Ashley’s exposition of the development of Metz’s thought is one of the best, perhaps even the best, available in English.” —Journal of Religion

Studies in Spirituality and Theology