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Memory and History in Christianity and Judaism

Memory and History in Christianity and Judaism

Edited by Michael A. Signer

Both Judaism and Christianity are communities bound by rituals of commemoration. At significant moments of gathering, each community reaffirms its identity in the present by calling to mind images and words from the past. The rise of modernity, however, has significantly altered the intellectual and social contexts in which Jews and Christians gather for prayer. During the past hundred years, both groups have been engaged in a creative dialogue with the historical disciplines, and these conversations have significantly altered their respective approaches to theological and religious language. Modernity has undermined a naive conjunction between memory and ritualization and challenged the validity of memory grounded in the authority of divine revelation.

The essays and responses in this important volume reflect a unique effort to respond to the disjunction between history and memory that has developed in the modern period. They affirm both the difficulty and the desirability of joining history and memory.

ISBN: 978-0-268-03460-3
248 pages
Publication Year: 2001

Michael A. Signer was the Adams Professor of Jewish Thought and Culture at the University of Notre Dame from 1992 until his death in 2009.

“In Memory And History In Christianity And Judaism, Michael Signer has gathered together an informative array of very highly recommended essays and responses by erudite and knowledgeable contributors affirming the difficulty and desireability of lining history and memory with the context of the Jewish and Christian communities.” — The Midwest Book Review

“Signer’s lively and provocative book…brings Christian and Jewish scholars from the disciplines of history, philosophy, and theology together in respectfully candid conversations with one another. This book is a ‘must read’ for everyone interested in the complexities of interfaith dialogue on questions crucial to synagogues and churches today. The entire book should be part of seminary and rabbinical school studies.” — Theology Today

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Military Chaplains from the First to the Twenty-First Century


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Enticement of Religion

Kees W. Bolle

Memory and History in Christianity and Judaism


Edited by Michael A. Signer

 Memory and History in Christianity and Judaism
Paper Edition

Both Judaism and Christianity are communities bound by rituals of commemoration. At significant moments of gathering, each community reaffirms its identity in the present by calling to mind images and words from the past. The rise of modernity, however, has significantly altered the intellectual and social contexts in which Jews and Christians gather for prayer. During the past hundred years, both groups have been engaged in a creative dialogue with the historical disciplines, and these conversations have significantly altered their respective approaches to theological and religious language. Modernity has undermined a naive conjunction between memory and ritualization and challenged the validity of memory grounded in the authority of divine revelation.

The essays and responses in this important volume reflect a unique effort to respond to the disjunction between history and memory that has developed in the modern period. They affirm both the difficulty and the desirability of joining history and memory.

ISBN: 978-0-268-03460-3

248 pages

“In Memory And History In Christianity And Judaism, Michael Signer has gathered together an informative array of very highly recommended essays and responses by erudite and knowledgeable contributors affirming the difficulty and desireability of lining history and memory with the context of the Jewish and Christian communities.” — The Midwest Book Review

“Signer’s lively and provocative book…brings Christian and Jewish scholars from the disciplines of history, philosophy, and theology together in respectfully candid conversations with one another. This book is a ‘must read’ for everyone interested in the complexities of interfaith dialogue on questions crucial to synagogues and churches today. The entire book should be part of seminary and rabbinical school studies.” — Theology Today