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Essay in Aid of A Grammar of Assent

An Essay in Aid of A Grammar of Assent

John Henry Cardinal Newman
Introduction by Nicholas Lash

This classic of Christian apologetics seeks to persuade the skeptic that there are good reasons to believe in God even though it is impossible to understand the deity fully. First written over a century ago, the Grammar of Assent speaks as powerfully to us today as it did to its first readers. Because of the informal, non-technical character of Newman’s work, it still retains its immediacy as an invaluable guide to the nature of religious belief. A new introduction by Nicholas Lash reviews the background of the Grammar, highlights its principal themes, and evaluates its philosophical originality.

ISBN: 978-0-268-01000-3
406 pages
Publication Year: 1979

Nicholas Lash is emeritus Norris-Hulse Professor of Divinity at the University of Cambridge and author of the book Easter in Ordinary, and Believing Three Ways in One God, both also published by the University of Notre Dame Press.

“Lash’s introduction to this recent reissue of Newman’s Grammar makes that work accessible to contemporary students of philosophy and theology alike. If one wishes a fresh perspective on the shape of the ‘critical questions’ facing philosophical theology, as well as an object lesson in the norms implicit in ordinary discourse properly employed, that person would be well advised to take up this century-old volume.” — Theological Studies

“The combination of Newman’s original genius, complemented by Nicholas Lash’s ability to focus his concerns onto ours, makes this edition a useful tool for teachers.” — America

“Here is presented one of the most famous 19th century statements of Christian apologetics, including a most influential analysis of the faith-reason controversy.” — Reprint Bulletin Book Reviews

P00129

Fifteen Sermons Preached before the University of Oxford Between A.D. 1826 and 1843

John Henry Cardinal NewmanIntroduction by Mary Katherine Tillman

P00183

Idea of a University

John Henry Cardinal Newman
Edited with an introduction and notes by Martin J. Svaglic

P00558

Newman and Conversion

John Henry Cardinal Newman
Edited by Ian Ker

P03263

God at the Crossroads of Worldviews

Toward a Different Debate about the Existence of God

Paul Seungoh Chung

P03160

Ten Philosophical Essays in the Christian Tradition

Frederick J. Crosson
Edited by Michael J. Crowe and Nicholas Ayo, C.S.C.Tribute by Mary Katherine TillmanIntroduction by Mark Moes

P03200

Loss and Gain

The Story of a Convert

John Henry Newman
Edited and Introduced by Sheridan Gilley

An Essay in Aid of A Grammar of Assent

John Henry Cardinal NewmanIntroduction by Nicholas Lash

An Essay in Aid of A Grammar of Assent
Paper Edition

This classic of Christian apologetics seeks to persuade the skeptic that there are good reasons to believe in God even though it is impossible to understand the deity fully. First written over a century ago, the Grammar of Assent speaks as powerfully to us today as it did to its first readers. Because of the informal, non-technical character of Newman’s work, it still retains its immediacy as an invaluable guide to the nature of religious belief. A new introduction by Nicholas Lash reviews the background of the Grammar, highlights its principal themes, and evaluates its philosophical originality.

ISBN: 978-0-268-01000-3

406 pages

“Lash’s introduction to this recent reissue of Newman’s Grammar makes that work accessible to contemporary students of philosophy and theology alike. If one wishes a fresh perspective on the shape of the ‘critical questions’ facing philosophical theology, as well as an object lesson in the norms implicit in ordinary discourse properly employed, that person would be well advised to take up this century-old volume.” — Theological Studies

“The combination of Newman’s original genius, complemented by Nicholas Lash’s ability to focus his concerns onto ours, makes this edition a useful tool for teachers.” — America

“Here is presented one of the most famous 19th century statements of Christian apologetics, including a most influential analysis of the faith-reason controversy.” — Reprint Bulletin Book Reviews