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Mind, Metaphysics, and Value in the Thomistic and Analytical Traditions

Mind, Metaphysics, and Value in the Thomistic and Analytical Traditions

Edited by John Haldane

Editor and Publisher’s Note: Parts of chapter 12, “Practical Reason and the Orders of Morals and Nature in Aquinas’s Theory of the Lex Naturae” by M. F. W. Stone, in the volume Mind, Metaphysics, and Value in the Thomistic and Analytical Traditions, ed. John Haldane (University of Notre Dame Press, 2002), have been subject to claims of plagiarism. The editor and publisher as a result cannot stand behind the noted material as originally contained in this volume. Interested readers can find original source material in Carlos Steele, “Natural Ends and Moral Ends According to Thomas Aquinas,” in Finalité et intentionnalité: Doctrine Thomiste et perspectives modernes, ed. J. Follon and J. McEvoy (Paris: J. Vrin, and Leuven: Peeters, 1992).

Contemporary western philosophy divides into three broad traditions: the analytical, the continental, and the historical. In the latter half of the twentieth century, analytical philosophy was dominant in the English-speaking world and tended to ignore the other two traditions. Now, however, analytical philosophy is less isolationist. It has come to appreciate the vitality of historical philosophy.

Given their commonality of interests and shared appreciation of the values of conceptual clarity and argumentative rigour, it is particularly appropriate that there should be engagement between the main English-language tradition and the philosophy of Aquinas and, more broadly, of Thomism. The essays in this collection range widely across the fields of metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of mind and action, and theory of value with most linking analytical and Aristotelian-Thomistic ideas and some focusing on Aquinas in particular.

This collection is distinctive in content and unusual in North American publishing in the areas of medieval philosophy, scholasticism, and Thomism in that the majority of the contributors are based in Europe—many at medieval
universities in which scholasticism had a historical presence, and in some cases a prominent and distinguished one.

Mind, Metaphysics, and Value brings together the interests, knowledge, and expertise of a wide range of scholars to form a broad and exciting intellectual community.

Contributors: Fergus Kerr, David Braine, Richard Cross, John Haldane, Christopher F. J. Martin, Stefaan Cuypers, Jonathan Jacobs, David S. Oderberg, Christopher Hughes, Gerald J. Hughes, S.J., Gyula Klima, and Martin W. F. Stone

Announcing a new series: Thomistic Studies, Daniel McInerny, General Editor

Thomistic Studies, sponsored by the Center for Thomistic Studies, University of St. Thomas, Houston, Texas, will publish works dealing with various aspects of the writings of Thomas Aquinas, analyses and interpretations of those writings, and the impact of Aquinas on writers and disciplines from the Middle Ages to the present day. Professor Daniel McInerny is Director of the Center for Thomistic Studies.

ISBN: 978-0-268-03467-2
240 pages
Publication Year: 2002

John Haldane is a professor of philosophy at the University of St Andrews, Scotland, and Royden Davis Professor of Humanities at Georgetown University, Washington DC.

“All of the essays in this volume are of high quality and present arguments and insights into philosophical problems that, however controversial they may appear to many advocates of the analytic method and the Thomistic tradition, are examples of solid historical scholarship combined with the use of the tools of philosophical analysis provided by analytic philosophy. This book warrants and will reward a close and careful reading.” — International Philosophical Quarterly

“All of the essays in this collection are of a very high standard, and they exhibit the combination of historical and textual sensitivity and rigour of argument that one would expect of analytically trained students of medieval philosophy.” — Religious Studies

“This collection of essays provides much to whet the appetite of those who like thinking about the questions of contemporary philosophy.” — New Blackfriars

“. . . the volume will appeal to anyone interested in seeing the value of reflecting from a contemporary point of view on the best of medieval thought. [T]hese essays demonstrate the type of work that must be done if medieval philosophy is ever to achieve the kind of recovery and appreciation already enjoyed by the neighboring fields of ancient and early modern philosophy.” — Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews

“. . . [T]his volume is a welcome contribution to the renewed interest in Aristotelian philosophy and a corrective to reductionist and ahistorical tendencies in contemporary philosophy.” — Ars Disputandi

“This book presents stimulating responses to contemporary philosophical issues in light of the thought of Thomas Aquinas. The work will likely be of interest to Analytic Thomists and even to analytic philosophers in general.” — The Review of Metaphysics

P03364

William Desmond and Contemporary Theology


Edited by Christopher Ben Simpson and Brendan Thomas Sammon

P03246

Problem of Evil

Selected Readings, Second Edition


Edited by Michael L. Peterson

P03287

Human Existence and Transcendence

Jean Wahl
Translated and
Edited by William C. Hackett
Foreword by Kevin Hart

Mind, Metaphysics, and Value in the Thomistic and Analytical Traditions


Edited by John Haldane

 Mind, Metaphysics, and Value in the Thomistic and Analytical Traditions
Cloth Edition

Editor and Publisher’s Note: Parts of chapter 12, “Practical Reason and the Orders of Morals and Nature in Aquinas’s Theory of the Lex Naturae” by M. F. W. Stone, in the volume Mind, Metaphysics, and Value in the Thomistic and Analytical Traditions, ed. John Haldane (University of Notre Dame Press, 2002), have been subject to claims of plagiarism. The editor and publisher as a result cannot stand behind the noted material as originally contained in this volume. Interested readers can find original source material in Carlos Steele, “Natural Ends and Moral Ends According to Thomas Aquinas,” in Finalité et intentionnalité: Doctrine Thomiste et perspectives modernes, ed. J. Follon and J. McEvoy (Paris: J. Vrin, and Leuven: Peeters, 1992).

Contemporary western philosophy divides into three broad traditions: the analytical, the continental, and the historical. In the latter half of the twentieth century, analytical philosophy was dominant in the English-speaking world and tended to ignore the other two traditions. Now, however, analytical philosophy is less isolationist. It has come to appreciate the vitality of historical philosophy.

Given their commonality of interests and shared appreciation of the values of conceptual clarity and argumentative rigour, it is particularly appropriate that there should be engagement between the main English-language tradition and the philosophy of Aquinas and, more broadly, of Thomism. The essays in this collection range widely across the fields of metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of mind and action, and theory of value with most linking analytical and Aristotelian-Thomistic ideas and some focusing on Aquinas in particular.

This collection is distinctive in content and unusual in North American publishing in the areas of medieval philosophy, scholasticism, and Thomism in that the majority of the contributors are based in Europe—many at medieval
universities in which scholasticism had a historical presence, and in some cases a prominent and distinguished one.

Mind, Metaphysics, and Value brings together the interests, knowledge, and expertise of a wide range of scholars to form a broad and exciting intellectual community.

Contributors: Fergus Kerr, David Braine, Richard Cross, John Haldane, Christopher F. J. Martin, Stefaan Cuypers, Jonathan Jacobs, David S. Oderberg, Christopher Hughes, Gerald J. Hughes, S.J., Gyula Klima, and Martin W. F. Stone

Announcing a new series: Thomistic Studies, Daniel McInerny, General Editor

Thomistic Studies, sponsored by the Center for Thomistic Studies, University of St. Thomas, Houston, Texas, will publish works dealing with various aspects of the writings of Thomas Aquinas, analyses and interpretations of those writings, and the impact of Aquinas on writers and disciplines from the Middle Ages to the present day. Professor Daniel McInerny is Director of the Center for Thomistic Studies.

ISBN: 978-0-268-03467-2

240 pages

“All of the essays in this volume are of high quality and present arguments and insights into philosophical problems that, however controversial they may appear to many advocates of the analytic method and the Thomistic tradition, are examples of solid historical scholarship combined with the use of the tools of philosophical analysis provided by analytic philosophy. This book warrants and will reward a close and careful reading.” — International Philosophical Quarterly

“All of the essays in this collection are of a very high standard, and they exhibit the combination of historical and textual sensitivity and rigour of argument that one would expect of analytically trained students of medieval philosophy.” — Religious Studies

“This collection of essays provides much to whet the appetite of those who like thinking about the questions of contemporary philosophy.” — New Blackfriars

“. . . the volume will appeal to anyone interested in seeing the value of reflecting from a contemporary point of view on the best of medieval thought. [T]hese essays demonstrate the type of work that must be done if medieval philosophy is ever to achieve the kind of recovery and appreciation already enjoyed by the neighboring fields of ancient and early modern philosophy.” — Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews

“. . . [T]his volume is a welcome contribution to the renewed interest in Aristotelian philosophy and a corrective to reductionist and ahistorical tendencies in contemporary philosophy.” — Ars Disputandi

“This book presents stimulating responses to contemporary philosophical issues in light of the thought of Thomas Aquinas. The work will likely be of interest to Analytic Thomists and even to analytic philosophers in general.” — The Review of Metaphysics

Thomistic Studies