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Boethian Commentaries of Clarembald of Arras

The Boethian Commentaries of Clarembald of Arras

Edited and Translated by David B. George and John R. Fortin, O.S.B.

“Well-grounded in the most up-to-date materials relating to Boethius and his medieval commentators, this book is of great assistance for the study of twelfth-century theology.” —Stephen F. Brown, Boston College

David George and John Fortin, O.S.B. offer students and scholars the first modern-language translation of commentaries by twelfth-century arts master Clarembald of Arras on two works by the Roman philosopher Boethius (480–524): De Hebdomadibus and De Trinitate. This useful volume also includes extensive notes and a helpful introduction discussing the biography of Clarembald, his writings, and his Latin style.

The Boethian Commentaries of Clarembald of Arras reveal that Clarembald, a student of Thierry of Chartres and Hugh of St. Victor, often departed from the style of the straightforward commentaries of his masters. It also shows that Clarembald used his commentaries to defend the Church from misconceptions and heresies that were considered a threat to orthodoxy during his time. This welcome translation is an invaluable resource for anyone with an interest in medieval philosophy and theology.

ISBN: 978-0-268-02168-9
192 pages
Publication Year: 2002

David B. George is professor and chair of classics at Saint Anselm College.

John R. Fortin, O.S.B., is a Benedictine monk of Saint Anselm Abbey in Manchester, New Hampshire, an associate professor of philosophy at Saint Anselm College, and director of the Institute for Saint Anselm Studies.

“. . . Draws upon the scholarship of Fortin’s previous study of Clarembald and provides for the first time a masterfully rendered English translation of Clarembald’s glosses on Boethius’s De Trinitate and De Hebdomadibus, about which Thierry had also written, along with helpful scholarly “glosses” in the form of notes. George and Fortin’s edition rises to Häring’s call and makes the case very strongly that scholars should reconsider Clarembald’s place in intellectual history, not just as the writer who confirmed that Thierry authored his famous glosses on Boethius but, more importantly, as an important figure of his time and one whose views on Boethius were earnestly sought out by his contemporaries because of his reputation as a Boethian scholar." — Carmina Philosophiae

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The Boethian Commentaries of Clarembald of Arras


Edited and
Translated by David B. George and John R. Fortin, O.S.B.

The Boethian Commentaries of Clarembald of Arras
Cloth Edition

“Well-grounded in the most up-to-date materials relating to Boethius and his medieval commentators, this book is of great assistance for the study of twelfth-century theology.” —Stephen F. Brown, Boston College

David George and John Fortin, O.S.B. offer students and scholars the first modern-language translation of commentaries by twelfth-century arts master Clarembald of Arras on two works by the Roman philosopher Boethius (480–524): De Hebdomadibus and De Trinitate. This useful volume also includes extensive notes and a helpful introduction discussing the biography of Clarembald, his writings, and his Latin style.

The Boethian Commentaries of Clarembald of Arras reveal that Clarembald, a student of Thierry of Chartres and Hugh of St. Victor, often departed from the style of the straightforward commentaries of his masters. It also shows that Clarembald used his commentaries to defend the Church from misconceptions and heresies that were considered a threat to orthodoxy during his time. This welcome translation is an invaluable resource for anyone with an interest in medieval philosophy and theology.

ISBN: 978-0-268-02168-9

192 pages

“. . . Draws upon the scholarship of Fortin’s previous study of Clarembald and provides for the first time a masterfully rendered English translation of Clarembald’s glosses on Boethius’s De Trinitate and De Hebdomadibus, about which Thierry had also written, along with helpful scholarly “glosses” in the form of notes. George and Fortin’s edition rises to Häring’s call and makes the case very strongly that scholars should reconsider Clarembald’s place in intellectual history, not just as the writer who confirmed that Thierry authored his famous glosses on Boethius but, more importantly, as an important figure of his time and one whose views on Boethius were earnestly sought out by his contemporaries because of his reputation as a Boethian scholar." — Carmina Philosophiae

Notre Dame Texts in Medieval Culture