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Genius to Improve an Invention

The Genius to Improve an Invention

Literary Transitions

Piero Boitani

The Genius to Improve an Invention derives its title from John Dryden’s phrase for the British tendency to take up literary masterpieces from the past and “perfect” them. Distinguished literary scholar Piero Boitani adopts Dryden’s notion as a framework for exploring ways in which classical and medieval texts, scenes, and themes have been rewritten by modern authors.

Boitani focuses on a concept of literary transition that takes into account both T.S. Eliot’s idea of “tradition and individual talent” and Harold Bloom’s “anxiety of influence.” In five elegant essays he examines a wide range of authors and texts, including Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Shakespeare, Chaucer, Voltaire, Goethe, Sartre, Dante, and Keats. Appearing for the first time in an English translation, The Genius to Improve an Invention will appeal to anyone interested in the Western literary tradition.

ISBN: 978-0-268-02950-0
168 pages
Publication Year: 2002

Piero Boitani is professor of comparative literature at the University of Rome, “La Sapienza.”

“This book deserves the attention of all who are interested in the processes of literary continuity and change.” —Frank Kermode, King’s College, Cambridge University

“The Genius to Improve an Invention is supported with a thorough theoretical awareness and a flexible intelligence enabling Boitani to move comfortably within a vast array of texts and thus take the reader on a fascinating literary journey. Through his pressing and detailed arguments, the author suggests original approaches to some of the great works of European literature—each of them is considered as a solution to a specific problem and, at the same time, as a probative argument in favor of applied rationality. Reading these essays calls to mind what Henry James once said: ‘All the pieces of the game [are] on the table together and each unconfusedly and contributively placed, as triumphantly scientific.’” —Mario Lavagetto, University of Bologna

“_The Genius to Improve an Invention _is both substantial and graceful—a fascinating journey through some of the greatest works of Western literature, with a guide who is at once learned and entertaining, impassioned and moving.” —Jill Mann, University of Notre Dame

“The book’s linguistic vicissitudes are intriguingly appropriate to its topic, which is the (mostly) translingual commerce between literary texts in which the difference evident in imitation can be understood as an inspired improvement." —American Journal of Philology

“Boitani’s slim book more than lives up to its unique production history in the extraordinary range of its subjects and insights. It is the kind of book that great men of letters once wrote. . . . The Genius to Improve an Invention_], once opened, it is a book almost impossible to put down.” —_Medium Aevum

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The Genius to Improve an Invention

Literary Transitions

Piero Boitani

The Genius to Improve an Invention: Literary Transitions
Cloth Edition
Paper Edition

The Genius to Improve an Invention derives its title from John Dryden’s phrase for the British tendency to take up literary masterpieces from the past and “perfect” them. Distinguished literary scholar Piero Boitani adopts Dryden’s notion as a framework for exploring ways in which classical and medieval texts, scenes, and themes have been rewritten by modern authors.

Boitani focuses on a concept of literary transition that takes into account both T.S. Eliot’s idea of “tradition and individual talent” and Harold Bloom’s “anxiety of influence.” In five elegant essays he examines a wide range of authors and texts, including Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Shakespeare, Chaucer, Voltaire, Goethe, Sartre, Dante, and Keats. Appearing for the first time in an English translation, The Genius to Improve an Invention will appeal to anyone interested in the Western literary tradition.

ISBN: 978-0-268-02950-0

168 pages

“This book deserves the attention of all who are interested in the processes of literary continuity and change.” —Frank Kermode, King’s College, Cambridge University

“The Genius to Improve an Invention is supported with a thorough theoretical awareness and a flexible intelligence enabling Boitani to move comfortably within a vast array of texts and thus take the reader on a fascinating literary journey. Through his pressing and detailed arguments, the author suggests original approaches to some of the great works of European literature—each of them is considered as a solution to a specific problem and, at the same time, as a probative argument in favor of applied rationality. Reading these essays calls to mind what Henry James once said: ‘All the pieces of the game [are] on the table together and each unconfusedly and contributively placed, as triumphantly scientific.’” —Mario Lavagetto, University of Bologna

“_The Genius to Improve an Invention _is both substantial and graceful—a fascinating journey through some of the greatest works of Western literature, with a guide who is at once learned and entertaining, impassioned and moving.” —Jill Mann, University of Notre Dame

“The book’s linguistic vicissitudes are intriguingly appropriate to its topic, which is the (mostly) translingual commerce between literary texts in which the difference evident in imitation can be understood as an inspired improvement." —American Journal of Philology

“Boitani’s slim book more than lives up to its unique production history in the extraordinary range of its subjects and insights. It is the kind of book that great men of letters once wrote. . . . The Genius to Improve an Invention_], once opened, it is a book almost impossible to put down.” —_Medium Aevum