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Reconciling Catholicism and Feminism?

Reconciling Catholicism and Feminism?

Personal Reflections on Tradition and Change

Edited by Sally Barr Ebest and Ron Ebest
Foreword by Sandra M. Gilbert

“I know of nothing in print that offers this engaging mix of voices rational and exalted, meliorative and audacious, troubled, pugnacious, quizzical, and sane.” —Judith Wilt, Boston College

“Good Catholic girls and great catholic women make feminism and Catholicism anything but a contradiction in terms. Authors of these essays demonstrate that the combination is a vital source for personal integration and social/ecclesial change. Feminist Catholicism proves that religions are dynamic activities indeed.” — Mary E. Hunt, Co-director of the Women’s Alliance for Theology, Ethics and Ritual (WATER)

In this timely collection of essays, twenty-two widely respected writers, historians, theologians, and feminists thoughtfully reflect on their own personal experiences with the Catholic Church. The essayists movingly describe how they have, or in some cases have not, come to terms with a church that does not permit them full participation. In so doing, they offer practical suggestions for ways in which the church can become more open to the concerns of its progressive members. In a format that is easily accessible to general readers, Reconciling Catholicism and Feminism? explores issues of concern to progressive and feminist Catholics, including abortion, birth control, clerical celibacy, and the ordination of women.

Contributors: Sandra M. Gilbert, Rosemary Radford Ruether, Jean Molesky-Poz, Janet Kalven, Jean McGarry, Madeleine Blais, Linda A. McMillin, Flavia Alaya, Victoria Kill, Nancy Mairs, Kathleen M. Joyce, Mary Kenny, Nilsa Lasso-Von Lang, Brad Peters, Jane Zeni, Kathleen A. Tobin, Mary Jo T. Marcellus, Lorraine Liscio, Jeanne Noonan-Eckholdt, Theresa Delgadillo, Henrik Borgstrom, Sally Barr Ebest, and Ron Ebest.

ISBN: 978-0-268-04014-7
320 pages
Publication Year: 2003

Sally Barr Ebest is professor of English and gender studies at the University of Missouri–St. Louis.

Ron Ebest teaches courses in literature and writing at the University of Missouri–St. Louis.

“. . . a must read for all thinking committed Catholics, especially bishops and priests. Here is a provocative collection of reflections and observations made by highly educated Catholics who are scholars, theologians, essayists, teachers, and writers and who are faithfully grappling with what is perhaps the most pressing question facing the Roman Catholic Church at the turn of the 21st Century: Is it possible to be a faithful Catholic and a progressive independent, even feminist, thinker?” — Catholic Library World

“This thoughtful work is recommended for academic libraries and for community libraries with a good religion circulation.” — Library Journal

“The editors were astute (and catholic) to include an international range of experiences of the Church and feminism.” — Boston College Magazine

“A nostalgic yet stimulating conversation with the author. Some I found familiar, like having lunch with old friends. Others were raw and provocative. In each of the chapters, the authors’ personal and intimate accounts reveal their hopes and dreams, along with a sense of hopelessness and defeat.” — Conscience

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Contemporary Irish American Women Writers


Edited by Sally Barr Ebest and Kathleen McInerney
Foreword by Caledonia Kearns

P01552

New Orleans Sisters of the Holy Family

African American Missionaries to the Garifuna of Belize

Edward T. Brett

P01501

Maryknoll Catholic Mission in Peru, 1943–1989

Transnational Faith and Transformation

Susan Fitzpatrick-Behrens

Reconciling Catholicism and Feminism?

Personal Reflections on Tradition and Change


Edited by Sally Barr Ebest and Ron Ebest
Foreword by Sandra M. Gilbert

 Reconciling Catholicism and Feminism? : Personal Reflections on Tradition and Change
Cloth Edition
Paper Edition

“I know of nothing in print that offers this engaging mix of voices rational and exalted, meliorative and audacious, troubled, pugnacious, quizzical, and sane.” —Judith Wilt, Boston College

“Good Catholic girls and great catholic women make feminism and Catholicism anything but a contradiction in terms. Authors of these essays demonstrate that the combination is a vital source for personal integration and social/ecclesial change. Feminist Catholicism proves that religions are dynamic activities indeed.” — Mary E. Hunt, Co-director of the Women’s Alliance for Theology, Ethics and Ritual (WATER)

In this timely collection of essays, twenty-two widely respected writers, historians, theologians, and feminists thoughtfully reflect on their own personal experiences with the Catholic Church. The essayists movingly describe how they have, or in some cases have not, come to terms with a church that does not permit them full participation. In so doing, they offer practical suggestions for ways in which the church can become more open to the concerns of its progressive members. In a format that is easily accessible to general readers, Reconciling Catholicism and Feminism? explores issues of concern to progressive and feminist Catholics, including abortion, birth control, clerical celibacy, and the ordination of women.

Contributors: Sandra M. Gilbert, Rosemary Radford Ruether, Jean Molesky-Poz, Janet Kalven, Jean McGarry, Madeleine Blais, Linda A. McMillin, Flavia Alaya, Victoria Kill, Nancy Mairs, Kathleen M. Joyce, Mary Kenny, Nilsa Lasso-Von Lang, Brad Peters, Jane Zeni, Kathleen A. Tobin, Mary Jo T. Marcellus, Lorraine Liscio, Jeanne Noonan-Eckholdt, Theresa Delgadillo, Henrik Borgstrom, Sally Barr Ebest, and Ron Ebest.

ISBN: 978-0-268-04014-7

320 pages

“. . . a must read for all thinking committed Catholics, especially bishops and priests. Here is a provocative collection of reflections and observations made by highly educated Catholics who are scholars, theologians, essayists, teachers, and writers and who are faithfully grappling with what is perhaps the most pressing question facing the Roman Catholic Church at the turn of the 21st Century: Is it possible to be a faithful Catholic and a progressive independent, even feminist, thinker?” — Catholic Library World

“This thoughtful work is recommended for academic libraries and for community libraries with a good religion circulation.” — Library Journal

“The editors were astute (and catholic) to include an international range of experiences of the Church and feminism.” — Boston College Magazine

“A nostalgic yet stimulating conversation with the author. Some I found familiar, like having lunch with old friends. Others were raw and provocative. In each of the chapters, the authors’ personal and intimate accounts reveal their hopes and dreams, along with a sense of hopelessness and defeat.” — Conscience