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Go Forth and Do Good

Go Forth and Do Good

Memorable Notre Dame Commencement Addresses

Edited by Wilson D. Miscamble, C.S.C.
Foreword by Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C.
Reflection by Edward A. Malloy, C.S.C.

“When God grabs you by the collar or grabs you by the shoulder and pushes you, inevitably you go. And when you go, you find your life radically changed. . . . Having received the best education that is available in one of the best institutions in the world, we expect a lot of you—and God will demand a lot of you.” —Andrew Young, from his 1988 Notre Dame Commencement Address

Although the first proper Notre Dame commencement—conferring degrees on two candidates—took place in 1849, General William Tecumseh Sherman was Notre Dame’s first graduation speaker with a truly national reputation. He attended Notre Dame’s ceremony in 1865, just months after accepting the surrender of General Joseph E. Johnston’s Confederate army. Sherman, whose sons had been students at Notre Dame, came less to give an address than to utter words of thanks for the kindness shown to his family, who had found refuge in the area during the war. When prevailed upon to speak he offered some extemporaneous remarks, calling on Notre Dame graduates and students to “be ready at all times to perform bravely the battle of life.”

Go Forth and Do Good: Memorable Notre Dame Commencement Addresses brings together twenty-four notable graduation speeches, ranging from the words General Sherman delivered in 1865 to President George W. Bush’s remarks in 2001. Also included in this fine collection is a letter sent to 1986 graduates by Mother Teresa and Father Theodore M. Hesburgh’s final charge to the graduating class of 1987. Wilson D. Miscamble, C.S.C., provides a delightful introduction that clarifies the importance of the selected speeches and places them in the context of the history of both Notre Dame and the world.

This inspiring volume belongs on the shelves of all Notre Dame alumni and makes a perfect graduation gift.

Speeches and Speakers Included in this Volume:

1865 • William Tecumseh Sherman, Perform Bravely the Battle of Life
1876 • William J. Onahan, The Catholic Citizen and the State
1886 • John Lancaster Spalding, Growth and Duty
1893 • Robert Seton, The Dignity of Labor
1904 • Charles J. Bonaparte, Some Thoughts for American Catholics
1917 • Joseph Chartrand, Education’s Grandest Work
1929 • William J. Donovan, Science, Civilization, and the Individual
1941 • Joseph P. Kennedy, Conscience, Patriotism, and Freedom of Speech
1952 • Charles H. Malik, The American Question
1959 • John A. McCone, The Atomic Energy Commission and the University
1960 • Dwight D. Eisenhower, Beyond the Campus
1961 • Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr., The Peace Corps and Higher Education
1965 • McGeorge Bundy, American Power and Responsibility
1967 • Eugene McCarthy, The Educated Person on Trial
1969 • Daniel Patrick Moynihan, Politics as the Art of the Impossible
1977 • Jimmy Carter, Foreign Policy and Human Rights
1981 • Ronald Reagan, Great Years Ahead for Our Country
1983 • Joseph Bernardin, The Challenge of Peace
1985 • Jose Napoleon Duarte, The Struggle for Democracy
1988 • Andrew Young, Let God and History Take You
1995 • Condoleezza Rice, The Role of the Educated Person
1996 • Mary Ann Glendon, Religion and a Democratic Society
2000 • Kofi A. Annan, World Poverty and Our Common Humanity
2001 • George W. Bush, A Caring Society

and
Mother Teresa of Calcutta, Letter to the Graduating Class of 1986
Father Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C., Charge to the Class of 1987

ISBN: 978-0-268-02956-2
312 pages
Publication Year: 2003

Wilson D. Miscamble, C.S.C., is professor of history at the University of Notre Dame.

“Anyone concerned about education, history, culture, politics, human and individual rights, moral values, government, peace, or life and living will find here both challenges and guidance.” — Catholic Library World

“The speeches given at University of Notre Dame commencements . . . offer a glimpse of the changing concerns and status of Catholics in America, as well as of Notre Dame’s prominent place in American Catholic life. . . .” — Indiana Magazine of History

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Go Forth and Do Good

Memorable Notre Dame Commencement Addresses


Edited by Wilson D. Miscamble, C.S.C.
Foreword by Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C.Reflection by Edward A. Malloy, C.S.C.

 Go Forth and Do Good: Memorable Notre Dame Commencement Addresses
Cloth Edition
Paper Edition

“When God grabs you by the collar or grabs you by the shoulder and pushes you, inevitably you go. And when you go, you find your life radically changed. . . . Having received the best education that is available in one of the best institutions in the world, we expect a lot of you—and God will demand a lot of you.” —Andrew Young, from his 1988 Notre Dame Commencement Address

Although the first proper Notre Dame commencement—conferring degrees on two candidates—took place in 1849, General William Tecumseh Sherman was Notre Dame’s first graduation speaker with a truly national reputation. He attended Notre Dame’s ceremony in 1865, just months after accepting the surrender of General Joseph E. Johnston’s Confederate army. Sherman, whose sons had been students at Notre Dame, came less to give an address than to utter words of thanks for the kindness shown to his family, who had found refuge in the area during the war. When prevailed upon to speak he offered some extemporaneous remarks, calling on Notre Dame graduates and students to “be ready at all times to perform bravely the battle of life.”

Go Forth and Do Good: Memorable Notre Dame Commencement Addresses brings together twenty-four notable graduation speeches, ranging from the words General Sherman delivered in 1865 to President George W. Bush’s remarks in 2001. Also included in this fine collection is a letter sent to 1986 graduates by Mother Teresa and Father Theodore M. Hesburgh’s final charge to the graduating class of 1987. Wilson D. Miscamble, C.S.C., provides a delightful introduction that clarifies the importance of the selected speeches and places them in the context of the history of both Notre Dame and the world.

This inspiring volume belongs on the shelves of all Notre Dame alumni and makes a perfect graduation gift.

Speeches and Speakers Included in this Volume:

1865 • William Tecumseh Sherman, Perform Bravely the Battle of Life
1876 • William J. Onahan, The Catholic Citizen and the State
1886 • John Lancaster Spalding, Growth and Duty
1893 • Robert Seton, The Dignity of Labor
1904 • Charles J. Bonaparte, Some Thoughts for American Catholics
1917 • Joseph Chartrand, Education’s Grandest Work
1929 • William J. Donovan, Science, Civilization, and the Individual
1941 • Joseph P. Kennedy, Conscience, Patriotism, and Freedom of Speech
1952 • Charles H. Malik, The American Question
1959 • John A. McCone, The Atomic Energy Commission and the University
1960 • Dwight D. Eisenhower, Beyond the Campus
1961 • Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr., The Peace Corps and Higher Education
1965 • McGeorge Bundy, American Power and Responsibility
1967 • Eugene McCarthy, The Educated Person on Trial
1969 • Daniel Patrick Moynihan, Politics as the Art of the Impossible
1977 • Jimmy Carter, Foreign Policy and Human Rights
1981 • Ronald Reagan, Great Years Ahead for Our Country
1983 • Joseph Bernardin, The Challenge of Peace
1985 • Jose Napoleon Duarte, The Struggle for Democracy
1988 • Andrew Young, Let God and History Take You
1995 • Condoleezza Rice, The Role of the Educated Person
1996 • Mary Ann Glendon, Religion and a Democratic Society
2000 • Kofi A. Annan, World Poverty and Our Common Humanity
2001 • George W. Bush, A Caring Society

and
Mother Teresa of Calcutta, Letter to the Graduating Class of 1986
Father Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C., Charge to the Class of 1987

ISBN: 978-0-268-02956-2

312 pages

“Anyone concerned about education, history, culture, politics, human and individual rights, moral values, government, peace, or life and living will find here both challenges and guidance.” — Catholic Library World

“The speeches given at University of Notre Dame commencements . . . offer a glimpse of the changing concerns and status of Catholics in America, as well as of Notre Dame’s prominent place in American Catholic life. . . .” — Indiana Magazine of History