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Galileo and the Catholic Church

Galileo and the Catholic Church

Annibale Fantoli

In this brief work, Annibale Fantoli examines the conclusions of the Catholic Church’s most recent commission to study Galileo in the context of the Ptolemaic-Copernican controversy. The commission declared that the Galileo case has been a sort of “myth,” in which the image fabricated out of the events was far removed from reality. According to the commission, the Galileo case was a symbol of the Church’s supposed rejection of scientific progress, or of dogmatic obscurantism opposed to the free search for truth. This “myth” in turn enabled scientists to claim that there was an incompatibility between the rules of science and the Christian faith. Fantoli argues that the conclusions of the commission do not appear to have given an adequate answer to the question of how and why the “myth of Galileo” developed.

ISBN: 978-88-209-6848-9
36 pages
Publication Year: 2003

Annibale Fantoli received his doctorate in astronomy from the University of Rome and his Licentiate degree in philosophy and theology from the Gregorian University. He has taught courses in cosmology and the philosophy of science at the universities of Sophia, Aoyama, and Musashino.

P01521

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Translated by George V. Coyne, S.J.

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Edited by John C. Cavadini and Danielle M. Peters

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Leonard J. DeLorenzo

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Michael H. McCarthy

Galileo and the Catholic Church

Annibale Fantoli

 Galileo and the Catholic Church
Paper Edition

In this brief work, Annibale Fantoli examines the conclusions of the Catholic Church’s most recent commission to study Galileo in the context of the Ptolemaic-Copernican controversy. The commission declared that the Galileo case has been a sort of “myth,” in which the image fabricated out of the events was far removed from reality. According to the commission, the Galileo case was a symbol of the Church’s supposed rejection of scientific progress, or of dogmatic obscurantism opposed to the free search for truth. This “myth” in turn enabled scientists to claim that there was an incompatibility between the rules of science and the Christian faith. Fantoli argues that the conclusions of the commission do not appear to have given an adequate answer to the question of how and why the “myth of Galileo” developed.

ISBN: 978-88-209-6848-9

36 pages

From the Vatican Observatory Foundation