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Peace Talks—Who Will Listen?

Peace Talks—Who Will Listen?

Fred Dallmayr

“A vibrant contemporary voice in the proliferating multicultural conversation of mankind, Professor Dallmayr makes the strongest case yet for a peace-making culture that would be able to restrain the war machine mentality of our present age. The debt that we all owe Professor Dallmayr has increased immeasurably with the publication of this his most recent volume.” —Calvin O. Schrag, Purdue University

“With gripping multicultural sensitivity, Professor Dallmayr opens our minds and hearts to an urgent, timely message of how to think about making peace. With penetrating insights and fascinating exploration, he shows that this message, which must be heeded if our species is to survive with dignity, has timeless roots that he vividly brings to light while drawing deftly on traditions at once ancient and modern, Western and Eastern, and from the global North and South.” —Robert C. Johansen, University of Notre Dame

If the contemporary philosophy of realpolitik and our inclination to accept definitions of politics as a struggle for power can be traced to Machiavelli, then Dallmayr has made a compelling case for a parallel and ethically grounded alternative view of both power and political practice. From the thought of Machiavelli’s contemporary, Erasmus, to the philosophical writings of Arendt, Rawls, and Bobbio, the cultural foundations of Confucianism, the political philosophy of liberalism, religious ethics reflected in the life and work of Christian and Islamic scholars, and the political practice of Gandhi, Dallmayr excavates the intellectual work of global peace and nonviolent politics. By framing the persistent search for a peaceful path to social justice within his own unrelenting belief in the eventual self-evidence of our common humanity, Peace Talks aims to kindle the philosophical possibility of a more peaceful and just basis for social order in an inescapably pluralistic and, at present, dangerously dissonant world." —Franke Wilmer, Montana State University

ISBN: 978-0-268-02568-7
288 pages
Publication Year: 2005

Fred Dallmayr is Emeritus Packey J. Dee Professor of Political Theory at the University of Notre Dame.

“This book has great strength. . . . The most important service it offers is that it gives both general readers and scholars a sense of the tremendous powers for peacemaking contained in the world’s philosophical and religious traditions. . . . The book is extremely interesting and useful. It is a helpful guide through the resources of peacemaking found throughout the world’s cultural traditions.” — Perspectives on Politics

“Dallmayr . . . intends for this study to be a call for peace in this age of strife, destruction, and desolation. . . . The scope of Dallmayr’s erudition here is a tour de force.” — Cistercian Studies Quarterly

“Fred Dallmayr has made another important contribution to comparative philosophical and religious studies from his well-known—and well-established—continental philosophical perspective.” — Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews

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Spiritual Guides

Pathfinders in the Desert

Fred Dallmayr

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Fred Dallmayr

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Offering Hospitality

Questioning Christian Approaches to War

Caron E. Gentry

Peace Talks—Who Will Listen?

Fred Dallmayr

 Peace Talks—Who Will Listen?
Cloth Edition
Paper Edition

“A vibrant contemporary voice in the proliferating multicultural conversation of mankind, Professor Dallmayr makes the strongest case yet for a peace-making culture that would be able to restrain the war machine mentality of our present age. The debt that we all owe Professor Dallmayr has increased immeasurably with the publication of this his most recent volume.” —Calvin O. Schrag, Purdue University

“With gripping multicultural sensitivity, Professor Dallmayr opens our minds and hearts to an urgent, timely message of how to think about making peace. With penetrating insights and fascinating exploration, he shows that this message, which must be heeded if our species is to survive with dignity, has timeless roots that he vividly brings to light while drawing deftly on traditions at once ancient and modern, Western and Eastern, and from the global North and South.” —Robert C. Johansen, University of Notre Dame

If the contemporary philosophy of realpolitik and our inclination to accept definitions of politics as a struggle for power can be traced to Machiavelli, then Dallmayr has made a compelling case for a parallel and ethically grounded alternative view of both power and political practice. From the thought of Machiavelli’s contemporary, Erasmus, to the philosophical writings of Arendt, Rawls, and Bobbio, the cultural foundations of Confucianism, the political philosophy of liberalism, religious ethics reflected in the life and work of Christian and Islamic scholars, and the political practice of Gandhi, Dallmayr excavates the intellectual work of global peace and nonviolent politics. By framing the persistent search for a peaceful path to social justice within his own unrelenting belief in the eventual self-evidence of our common humanity, Peace Talks aims to kindle the philosophical possibility of a more peaceful and just basis for social order in an inescapably pluralistic and, at present, dangerously dissonant world." —Franke Wilmer, Montana State University

ISBN: 978-0-268-02568-7

288 pages

“This book has great strength. . . . The most important service it offers is that it gives both general readers and scholars a sense of the tremendous powers for peacemaking contained in the world’s philosophical and religious traditions. . . . The book is extremely interesting and useful. It is a helpful guide through the resources of peacemaking found throughout the world’s cultural traditions.” — Perspectives on Politics

“Dallmayr . . . intends for this study to be a call for peace in this age of strife, destruction, and desolation. . . . The scope of Dallmayr’s erudition here is a tour de force.” — Cistercian Studies Quarterly

“Fred Dallmayr has made another important contribution to comparative philosophical and religious studies from his well-known—and well-established—continental philosophical perspective.” — Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews