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How Should We Talk about Religion?

How Should We Talk about Religion?

Perspectives, Contexts, Particularities

Edited by James Boyd White

“Avoiding the recriminatory rhetoric that all too often pervades cultural, political, and scholarly debates, the authors of these first-rate essays reveal the many ways in which sensitivity to religious belief, thought, and discourse enhances and, in many respects, is absolutely necessary to serious inquiry in their diverse areas of expertise.” —Joseph A. Buttigieg, William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of English, University of Notre Dame

In this wide-ranging and timely volume, fourteen scholars address the important question, How should we talk about religion, whether our own or the religion of others? They confront such fundamental topics as the sufficiency of “reason” for a full life; the adequacy of our methods of describing and analyzing religion; the degree to which any serious confrontation with the religious experiences of others will challenge our own; and whether there can be a pluralism that does not dissolve into universal relativism.

Writing from a diversity of perspectives and academic disciplines—philosophy, classics, medieval studies, history, anthropology, economics, political science, and art history, among others—the contributors illuminate issues at the heart of the most significant cultural, social, and political debates of our day.

What emerges is not a univocal answer to the question posed in the title. Instead, by demonstrating how religion is talked about in the languages of very different academic disciplines, the essayists creatively address issues that no one should ignore: fundamentalism; the role of religion in American democracy; the tension between secular liberalism and religious rhetoric; monotheism versus pluralism; and the relationship between poverty and liberation theology. Collectively, their various approaches to talking about religion—differences due to background, age, nationality, religious outlook, and intellectual commitment, yet all valid—provide a general response to the question in the book’s title: in intellectual and personal community.

Contributors: Luis E. Bacigalupo, Clifford Ando, Sabine MacCormack, R. Scott Appleby, Bilinda Straight, Patrick J. Deneen, Wayne C. Booth (1921–2005), Eugene Garver, Javier Iguíñiz Echeverría, Ruth Abbey, Sol Serrano, Carol Bier, Jeffrey Kripal, Ebrahim Moosa.

ISBN: 978-0-268-04407-7
336 pages
Publication Year: 2006

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James Boyd White is Hart Wright Professor of Law, professor of English, and adjunct professor of classical studies at the University of Michigan.

“A diverse group of faculty from various universities and academic specialties—philosophy, history, English, anthropology, art history, and Islamic studies—explores how scholars address religion in their fields and how they can share their perspectives across disciplinary boundaries . . . There is something here for everyone. . . . Recommended for academic and larger public libraries.” — Library Journal

“This wide ranging volume addresses important questions that point the way to talking about religion across disciplinary and religious boundaries. . . Both scholars and laypeople will likely profit from this volume.” — Choice

“Readers will be stimulated by the range of issues discussed and how religious experience is shaped by pre-existing conceptions and experiences. The interplay of scholarly, political, sociocultural, psychological, and experiential perspectives which these essays highlight is a valuable contribution in itself.” — Perspectives on Science and Christian Faith

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P01303

Hidden Holiness

Michael Plekon
Foreword by Rowan Williams

P01291

Praying the Psalms in Christ

Laurence Kriegshauser, O.S.B.

P00840

Road of the Heart’s Desire

An Essay on the Cycles of Story and Song

John S. Dunne

How Should We Talk about Religion?

Perspectives, Contexts, Particularities


Edited by James Boyd White

 How Should We Talk about Religion?: Perspectives, Contexts, Particularities
Paper Edition

“Avoiding the recriminatory rhetoric that all too often pervades cultural, political, and scholarly debates, the authors of these first-rate essays reveal the many ways in which sensitivity to religious belief, thought, and discourse enhances and, in many respects, is absolutely necessary to serious inquiry in their diverse areas of expertise.” —Joseph A. Buttigieg, William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of English, University of Notre Dame

In this wide-ranging and timely volume, fourteen scholars address the important question, How should we talk about religion, whether our own or the religion of others? They confront such fundamental topics as the sufficiency of “reason” for a full life; the adequacy of our methods of describing and analyzing religion; the degree to which any serious confrontation with the religious experiences of others will challenge our own; and whether there can be a pluralism that does not dissolve into universal relativism.

Writing from a diversity of perspectives and academic disciplines—philosophy, classics, medieval studies, history, anthropology, economics, political science, and art history, among others—the contributors illuminate issues at the heart of the most significant cultural, social, and political debates of our day.

What emerges is not a univocal answer to the question posed in the title. Instead, by demonstrating how religion is talked about in the languages of very different academic disciplines, the essayists creatively address issues that no one should ignore: fundamentalism; the role of religion in American democracy; the tension between secular liberalism and religious rhetoric; monotheism versus pluralism; and the relationship between poverty and liberation theology. Collectively, their various approaches to talking about religion—differences due to background, age, nationality, religious outlook, and intellectual commitment, yet all valid—provide a general response to the question in the book’s title: in intellectual and personal community.

Contributors: Luis E. Bacigalupo, Clifford Ando, Sabine MacCormack, R. Scott Appleby, Bilinda Straight, Patrick J. Deneen, Wayne C. Booth (1921–2005), Eugene Garver, Javier Iguíñiz Echeverría, Ruth Abbey, Sol Serrano, Carol Bier, Jeffrey Kripal, Ebrahim Moosa.

ISBN: 978-0-268-04407-7

336 pages

“A diverse group of faculty from various universities and academic specialties—philosophy, history, English, anthropology, art history, and Islamic studies—explores how scholars address religion in their fields and how they can share their perspectives across disciplinary boundaries . . . There is something here for everyone. . . . Recommended for academic and larger public libraries.” — Library Journal

“This wide ranging volume addresses important questions that point the way to talking about religion across disciplinary and religious boundaries. . . Both scholars and laypeople will likely profit from this volume.” — Choice

“Readers will be stimulated by the range of issues discussed and how religious experience is shaped by pre-existing conceptions and experiences. The interplay of scholarly, political, sociocultural, psychological, and experiential perspectives which these essays highlight is a valuable contribution in itself.” — Perspectives on Science and Christian Faith

Erasmus Institute Books