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Ireland Now

Ireland Now

Tales of Change from the Global Island

William Flanagan

“This book is valuable because it digs beneath the endlessly repeated litany of the rapid changes in modern Ireland, such as ‘globalization,’ ‘the Celtic Tiger,’ ‘Fourth highest per capita GDP in the world,’ ‘church in decline,’ ‘educated young people,’ and the list goes on. Ireland Now lays out the changing Ireland framework and the goal of finding how it plays out in the everyday life of the people in the book. Readers in sociology, cultural anthropology, and political science will find or recognize the pressures on people located in a kaleidoscopically changing environment.” — Richard B. Finnegan, Stonehill College

Ireland Now is an accessible guide to understanding how Ireland and the Irish people have changed during the past fifteen years. Largely as a result of the country’s rapidly expanding economy, Ireland has been transformed from one of the poorest to one of the richest countries in the European Union. William Flanagan uses personal, first-hand stories from a wide range of Irish citizens, including the elderly, farmers, people in small towns and rural areas, and new immigrants, to illustrate how various segments of the population are coping with a shifting social landscape.

Flanagan skillfully weaves his stories of real people together to reflect themes of promise and loss attached to economic upheaval, the struggle to maintain traditional ways in the face of new social and moral orders, the effort to adapt to a country with an enhanced place in the world economy, and the challenge of remaining at home as the meaning of home becomes forever changed.

Based on years of Flanagan’s personal experience and careful research in Ireland, this important book examines the nature of Irish character and the fusion of tradition and change. It will appeal to anyone with an interest in Ireland and Irish identity.

ISBN: 978-0-268-02886-2
288 pages
Publication Year: 2007

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William Flanagan is professor of sociology at Coe College. He is the author of Urban Sociology: Images and Structure and Contemporary Urban Sociology.

“William Flanagan focuses on the past decade and a half, which have seen such profound economic, religious, and cultural changes in Ireland. Perhaps most interesting about Ireland Now is that it combines analysis of broad current events with interviews with regular Irish people whose lives have been upended in recent years—for better or worse.” — Irish America

“This is an accessible guide explaining how Ireland and the Irish people have changed during the past fifteen years. Largely a result of the country’s rapidly expanding economy, Ireland has transformed from one of the poorest to one of the richest countries in the EU. The author uses personal, first hand stories from a wide range of Irish citizens, including the elderly, farmers, people in small towns and rural areas, and recent immigrants to show how various segments of the population are coping with the shifting social landscape.” — Abstracts of Public Administration, Development, and Environment

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P03443

Ghosts of the Somme

Commemoration and Culture War in Northern Ireland

Jonathan Evershed

P03427

Coming of the Celts, AD 1860

Celtic Nationalism in Ireland and Wales

Caoimhín De Barra

P03380

Irish Ethnologies


Edited by Diarmuid Ó Giolláin

Ireland Now

Tales of Change from the Global Island

William Flanagan

 Ireland Now: Tales of Change from the Global Island
Paper Edition

“This book is valuable because it digs beneath the endlessly repeated litany of the rapid changes in modern Ireland, such as ‘globalization,’ ‘the Celtic Tiger,’ ‘Fourth highest per capita GDP in the world,’ ‘church in decline,’ ‘educated young people,’ and the list goes on. Ireland Now lays out the changing Ireland framework and the goal of finding how it plays out in the everyday life of the people in the book. Readers in sociology, cultural anthropology, and political science will find or recognize the pressures on people located in a kaleidoscopically changing environment.” — Richard B. Finnegan, Stonehill College

Ireland Now is an accessible guide to understanding how Ireland and the Irish people have changed during the past fifteen years. Largely as a result of the country’s rapidly expanding economy, Ireland has been transformed from one of the poorest to one of the richest countries in the European Union. William Flanagan uses personal, first-hand stories from a wide range of Irish citizens, including the elderly, farmers, people in small towns and rural areas, and new immigrants, to illustrate how various segments of the population are coping with a shifting social landscape.

Flanagan skillfully weaves his stories of real people together to reflect themes of promise and loss attached to economic upheaval, the struggle to maintain traditional ways in the face of new social and moral orders, the effort to adapt to a country with an enhanced place in the world economy, and the challenge of remaining at home as the meaning of home becomes forever changed.

Based on years of Flanagan’s personal experience and careful research in Ireland, this important book examines the nature of Irish character and the fusion of tradition and change. It will appeal to anyone with an interest in Ireland and Irish identity.

ISBN: 978-0-268-02886-2

288 pages

“William Flanagan focuses on the past decade and a half, which have seen such profound economic, religious, and cultural changes in Ireland. Perhaps most interesting about Ireland Now is that it combines analysis of broad current events with interviews with regular Irish people whose lives have been upended in recent years—for better or worse.” — Irish America

“This is an accessible guide explaining how Ireland and the Irish people have changed during the past fifteen years. Largely a result of the country’s rapidly expanding economy, Ireland has transformed from one of the poorest to one of the richest countries in the EU. The author uses personal, first hand stories from a wide range of Irish citizens, including the elderly, farmers, people in small towns and rural areas, and recent immigrants to show how various segments of the population are coping with the shifting social landscape.” — Abstracts of Public Administration, Development, and Environment