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Electronic Literature

P01247
P01247
Series
The Yusko Ward-Phillips Lectures in English Language and Literature
Awards

Selected as one of the winners in the 2009 AAUP Book, Jacket, and Journal Show, Scholarly Typographic category

Winner of the Crystal Book Award of Excellence, Scholarly Reference, Chicago Book Clinic Book and Media Show 2008

Categories

Electronic Literature

New Horizons for the Literary

N. Katherine Hayles

A visible presence for some two decades, electronic literature has already produced many works that deserve the rigorous scrutiny critics have long practiced with print literature. Only now, however, with Electronic Literature by N. Katherine Hayles, do we have the first systematic survey of the field and an analysis of its importance, breadth, and wide-ranging implications for literary study.

Hayles’s book is designed to help electronic literature move into the classroom. Her systematic survey of the field addresses its major genres, the challenges it poses to traditional literary theory, and the complex and compelling issues at stake. She develops a theoretical framework for understanding how electronic literature both draws on the print tradition and requires new reading and interpretive strategies. Grounding her approach in the evolutionary dynamic between humans and technology, Hayles argues that neither the body nor the machine should be given absolute theoretical priority. Rather, she focuses on the interconnections between embodied writers and users and the intelligent machines that perform electronic texts.

Through close readings of important works, Hayles demonstrates that a new mode of narration is emerging that differs significantly from previous models. Key to her argument is the observation that almost all contemporary literature has its genesis as electronic files, so that print becomes a specific mode for electronic text rather than an entirely different medium. Hayles illustrates the implications of this condition with three contemporary novels that bear the mark of the digital.

Included with the book is a CD, The Electronic Literature Collection, Volume 1, containing sixty new and recent works of electronic literature with keyword index, authors’ notes, and editorial headnotes. Representing multiple modalities of electronic writing—hypertext fiction, kinetic poetry, generative and combinatory forms, network writing, codework, 3D, narrative animations, installation pieces, and Flash poetry—the ELC 1 encompasses comparatively low-tech work alongside heavily coded pieces. Complementing the text and the CD-ROM is a website offering resources for teachers and students, including sample syllabi, original essays, author biographies, and useful links. Together, the three elements provide an exceptional pedagogical opportunity.

— Produced under the aegis of the Electronic Literature Organization, and edited by Hayles, Nick Montfort, Scott Rettberg, and Stephanie Strickland, The Electronic Literature Collection, Volume 1, brings together numerous genres by many of the most innovative writers in the field. The ELC 1 runs cross-platform on Macintosh, PC, or Linux.

Visit the related website at http://newhorizons.eliterature.org for postings, classroom materials, and more.

ADVANCE PRAISE:
“No critic, save N. Katherine Hayles, has the wide grasp of literary criticism, new media history and technology, cyberculture and its philosophical implications, and the interplay between electronic and print imaginative writing. Now, in the five straightforward, readable chapters of Electronic Literature, she supplies the tools and builds the contexts necessary for everyone to grasp the importance of her topic and integrate it into her or his own knowledge base. For those new to electronic literature, it provides an intellectual, historical, and technical basis for inserting it into the curriculum; for those familiar with the digital arts and electronic literature, it provides a succinct overview of what has been accomplished in the field and what remains to bring this work from the hands of practitioners and theorists into the classroom. The book and CD package will be snapped up by scholars and students alike.” —Dee Morris, University of Iowa

“In Electronic Literature, N. Katherine Hayles has delivered a wonderfully structured synthetic overview of writers, texts, critics, and publication venues for the field of electronic literature. In it, she has managed to articulate a non-canonical canon, a body of work and set of ideas that are flexible rather than fixed, inclusive rather than exclusive.” —Rita Raley, University of California, Santa Barbara

“Kate Hayles has been there since the beginning. She helped formulate the field of digital literature. All readers will be charmed by her new book; high school and college literature and art teachers, in particular, will find this book (and the CD) immediately helpful to introducing students to creative writing in a new media mode.” —Thom Swiss, University of Minnesota

“Kate Hayles stays with a text, whether electronic or otherwise, like almost no other reader or player, inhabiting each work with care and caring, transforming its material specificity to embodied sense and sensuality rather than a hollow category. In the course of defining a field she has set it abloom and in the process refreshed our imagination.” —Michael Joyce, Vassar College

Praise for the ELC 1:
“. . . [T]his is an essential collection. Anyone interested in the field of electronic literature should take the trouble to get it. . . . Some of this material is priceless, and it may not be available on the Web indefinitely.” —Edward Picot, The Hyperliterature Exchange

ISBN: 978-0-268-03084-1
240 pages
Publication Year: 2008

Pdf   Download Table of Contents

N. Katherine Hayles is John Charles Hillis Professor of Literature and Distinguished Professor in the departments of English and Design/Media Arts at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Electronic Literature is much more than a didactic summary of Hayles’s thinking on the digital revolution in one of the bastions of traditional humanist culture: the book. Although this aspect of the book is far from being unimportant . . . Electronic Literature is also a synthesis of the research in the field as a whole, and in this sense the best possible critical overview that is currently available. Moreover, it is extremely up to date, given the numerous references to extremely recent sources, and in-depth discussions with all the authors who count in the field.” — Image [&] Narrative

“Electronic literature is an emerging literary genre that challenges the traditional understanding of literary criticism and theory. It is this challenge, in part, that is responsible for keeping the emerging genre out of the classroom, and with this work, Hayles means to grant it entry. Drawing on technology-related literary criticism and theory, she creates a new space for electronic literature to be read and understood. She argues that the impact of the digital on modern writing cannot be underestimated.” — Library Journal

“Hayles surveys cutting-edge electronic literature in the 21st century and provides a CD-ROM including dozens of complete works. . . . One argument runs through the book: human bodies and technologies are always mutually forming and reshaping one another in what the author calls ‘recursive feedback loops.’ . . . An introduction to the avant-garde in computers and literature. . . .” — Choice

“N. Katherine Hayles’s Electronic Literature: New Horizons for the Literary exemplifies the current disciplinary drive to establish a critical language for speaking about digital literature. . . . Hayles portrays the future of electronic literature as one of undecidable flux in which code, medial output, humans, and machines are in constant play with one another. . . . This anthology of electronic literature will play a significant role in defining the perception of contemporary electronic literature, thus shaping the practice of future generations of digital artists.” — Postmodern Culture

“[Hayles] examines the place of electronic literature in society today, and considers what large-scale social and cultural changes are bound up with the spread of digital culture, and what they portend for the future of writing.” — Journal of Economic Literature

“Katherine Hayles is a major shaper of this field, and I think this book is a valuable addition because it’s an introduction, a primer to what digital literature is an how it can be . . . There’s a lot of work to be done in the criticism of this emergent field: to explain not only the link between print and digital media but also the link between contemporary and older works, literary forms and reading practices.” — Jessica Pressman’s FiveBooks.com

“Hayles brings to the discussion a deep legacy of critical thought around digital ontology, narrative, and the technologies of expression. For the uninitiated, Hayle’s explication is tremendously useful. She understands not just the texts but also the contexts from which they emerge, and she is able to use electronic literature as a gateway to suggesting new philosophical ways of perceiving collective computations like the stock market.” — Rain Taxi

“[Hayles] describes the transition from page to screen and the contexts for electronic literature (namely, the body and the machine), and shows how the genre is both revealing and transforming as it revalues computational practice.” — Book News

Pdf   Download Excerpt

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Electronic Literature

New Horizons for the Literary

N. Katherine Hayles

 Electronic Literature: New Horizons for the Literary
Cloth Edition
Paper Edition

A visible presence for some two decades, electronic literature has already produced many works that deserve the rigorous scrutiny critics have long practiced with print literature. Only now, however, with Electronic Literature by N. Katherine Hayles, do we have the first systematic survey of the field and an analysis of its importance, breadth, and wide-ranging implications for literary study.

Hayles’s book is designed to help electronic literature move into the classroom. Her systematic survey of the field addresses its major genres, the challenges it poses to traditional literary theory, and the complex and compelling issues at stake. She develops a theoretical framework for understanding how electronic literature both draws on the print tradition and requires new reading and interpretive strategies. Grounding her approach in the evolutionary dynamic between humans and technology, Hayles argues that neither the body nor the machine should be given absolute theoretical priority. Rather, she focuses on the interconnections between embodied writers and users and the intelligent machines that perform electronic texts.

Through close readings of important works, Hayles demonstrates that a new mode of narration is emerging that differs significantly from previous models. Key to her argument is the observation that almost all contemporary literature has its genesis as electronic files, so that print becomes a specific mode for electronic text rather than an entirely different medium. Hayles illustrates the implications of this condition with three contemporary novels that bear the mark of the digital.

Included with the book is a CD, The Electronic Literature Collection, Volume 1, containing sixty new and recent works of electronic literature with keyword index, authors’ notes, and editorial headnotes. Representing multiple modalities of electronic writing—hypertext fiction, kinetic poetry, generative and combinatory forms, network writing, codework, 3D, narrative animations, installation pieces, and Flash poetry—the ELC 1 encompasses comparatively low-tech work alongside heavily coded pieces. Complementing the text and the CD-ROM is a website offering resources for teachers and students, including sample syllabi, original essays, author biographies, and useful links. Together, the three elements provide an exceptional pedagogical opportunity.

— Produced under the aegis of the Electronic Literature Organization, and edited by Hayles, Nick Montfort, Scott Rettberg, and Stephanie Strickland, The Electronic Literature Collection, Volume 1, brings together numerous genres by many of the most innovative writers in the field. The ELC 1 runs cross-platform on Macintosh, PC, or Linux.

Visit the related website at http://newhorizons.eliterature.org for postings, classroom materials, and more.

ADVANCE PRAISE:
“No critic, save N. Katherine Hayles, has the wide grasp of literary criticism, new media history and technology, cyberculture and its philosophical implications, and the interplay between electronic and print imaginative writing. Now, in the five straightforward, readable chapters of Electronic Literature, she supplies the tools and builds the contexts necessary for everyone to grasp the importance of her topic and integrate it into her or his own knowledge base. For those new to electronic literature, it provides an intellectual, historical, and technical basis for inserting it into the curriculum; for those familiar with the digital arts and electronic literature, it provides a succinct overview of what has been accomplished in the field and what remains to bring this work from the hands of practitioners and theorists into the classroom. The book and CD package will be snapped up by scholars and students alike.” —Dee Morris, University of Iowa

“In Electronic Literature, N. Katherine Hayles has delivered a wonderfully structured synthetic overview of writers, texts, critics, and publication venues for the field of electronic literature. In it, she has managed to articulate a non-canonical canon, a body of work and set of ideas that are flexible rather than fixed, inclusive rather than exclusive.” —Rita Raley, University of California, Santa Barbara

“Kate Hayles has been there since the beginning. She helped formulate the field of digital literature. All readers will be charmed by her new book; high school and college literature and art teachers, in particular, will find this book (and the CD) immediately helpful to introducing students to creative writing in a new media mode.” —Thom Swiss, University of Minnesota

“Kate Hayles stays with a text, whether electronic or otherwise, like almost no other reader or player, inhabiting each work with care and caring, transforming its material specificity to embodied sense and sensuality rather than a hollow category. In the course of defining a field she has set it abloom and in the process refreshed our imagination.” —Michael Joyce, Vassar College

Praise for the ELC 1:
“. . . [T]his is an essential collection. Anyone interested in the field of electronic literature should take the trouble to get it. . . . Some of this material is priceless, and it may not be available on the Web indefinitely.” —Edward Picot, The Hyperliterature Exchange

ISBN: 978-0-268-03084-1

240 pages

Electronic Literature is much more than a didactic summary of Hayles’s thinking on the digital revolution in one of the bastions of traditional humanist culture: the book. Although this aspect of the book is far from being unimportant . . . Electronic Literature is also a synthesis of the research in the field as a whole, and in this sense the best possible critical overview that is currently available. Moreover, it is extremely up to date, given the numerous references to extremely recent sources, and in-depth discussions with all the authors who count in the field.” — Image [&] Narrative

“Electronic literature is an emerging literary genre that challenges the traditional understanding of literary criticism and theory. It is this challenge, in part, that is responsible for keeping the emerging genre out of the classroom, and with this work, Hayles means to grant it entry. Drawing on technology-related literary criticism and theory, she creates a new space for electronic literature to be read and understood. She argues that the impact of the digital on modern writing cannot be underestimated.” — Library Journal

“Hayles surveys cutting-edge electronic literature in the 21st century and provides a CD-ROM including dozens of complete works. . . . One argument runs through the book: human bodies and technologies are always mutually forming and reshaping one another in what the author calls ‘recursive feedback loops.’ . . . An introduction to the avant-garde in computers and literature. . . .” — Choice

“N. Katherine Hayles’s Electronic Literature: New Horizons for the Literary exemplifies the current disciplinary drive to establish a critical language for speaking about digital literature. . . . Hayles portrays the future of electronic literature as one of undecidable flux in which code, medial output, humans, and machines are in constant play with one another. . . . This anthology of electronic literature will play a significant role in defining the perception of contemporary electronic literature, thus shaping the practice of future generations of digital artists.” — Postmodern Culture

“[Hayles] examines the place of electronic literature in society today, and considers what large-scale social and cultural changes are bound up with the spread of digital culture, and what they portend for the future of writing.” — Journal of Economic Literature

“Katherine Hayles is a major shaper of this field, and I think this book is a valuable addition because it’s an introduction, a primer to what digital literature is an how it can be . . . There’s a lot of work to be done in the criticism of this emergent field: to explain not only the link between print and digital media but also the link between contemporary and older works, literary forms and reading practices.” — Jessica Pressman’s FiveBooks.com

“Hayles brings to the discussion a deep legacy of critical thought around digital ontology, narrative, and the technologies of expression. For the uninitiated, Hayle’s explication is tremendously useful. She understands not just the texts but also the contexts from which they emerge, and she is able to use electronic literature as a gateway to suggesting new philosophical ways of perceiving collective computations like the stock market.” — Rain Taxi

“[Hayles] describes the transition from page to screen and the contexts for electronic literature (namely, the body and the machine), and shows how the genre is both revealing and transforming as it revalues computational practice.” — Book News

The Yusko Ward-Phillips Lectures in English Language and Literature

Selected as one of the winners in the 2009 AAUP Book, Jacket, and Journal Show, Scholarly Typographic categoryWinner of the Crystal Book Award of Excellence, Scholarly Reference, Chicago Book Clinic Book and Media Show 2008