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Desiring Bodies

Desiring Bodies

Ovidian Romance and the Cult of Form

Gregory Heyworth

Gregory Heyworth’s Desiring Bodies considers the physical body and its relationship to poetic and corporate bodies in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Beginning in the odd contest between body and form in the first sentence of Ovid’s protean Metamorphoses, Heyworth identifies these concepts as structuring principles of civic and poetic unity and pursues their consequences as refracted through a series of romances, some typical of the genre, some problematically so.

Bodies, in Ovidian romance, are the objects of human desire to possess, to recover, to form, or to violate. Part 1 examines this desire as both a literal and socio-political phenomenon through readings of Marie de France’s Lais, Chrétien de Troyes’ Cligès and Perceval, and Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, texts variously expressing social, economic, and political culture in romance. In part 2, Heyworth is concerned with missing or absent bodies in Petrarch’s Rime sparse, Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, and Milton’s Paradise Lost and the generic rupture they cause in lyric, tragedy, and epic. Throughout, Heyworth draws on social theorists such as Kant, Weber, Simmel, and Elias to explore the connection between social and literary form.

The first comparative, diachronic study of romance form in many years, Desiring Bodies is a persuasive and important cultural history that demonstrates Ovid’s pervasive influence not only on the poetics but on the politics of the medieval and early modern Western tradition.

Gregory Heyworth’s Desiring Bodies: Ovidian Romance and the Cult of Form is a wide-ranging, impressively learned, first-rate study with a provocative and weighty central argument.” — Monika Otter, Dartmouth College

Desiring Bodies answers the question that might dog Comparative Literature as a discipline (i.e. “so what?”). In a bravura display of cultural and linguistic range, Heyworth turns his own supple, Ovidian intelligence to Ovidian irruptions from within the civilizing project of romance. Heyworth writes with intense literary inwardness, adroitly turned learning, and pitch-perfect prose.” — James Simpson, Harvard University

“Gregory Heyworth’s Desiring Bodies is a highly original study. It is also very daring—breathtakingly so, at times—in its deep engagement with major canonical writers and texts of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, from twelfth-century Latin comedy to Milton’s Paradise Lost. His remarkable essay is achieved within a stimulating cultural and artistic exegesis of a single Ovidian line in which Heyworth finds his own large subject—the famous first line of the Metamorphoses, in which the poet announces the intention to tell ‘of forms changed into new bodies.’ ” — John Fleming, Princeton University

“Ambitious in its aims, convincing in its arguments, and frequently surprising in its readings, Desiring Bodies asks us to reconsider how literary works both respond to and adapt the remains of the literary past. By establishing Ovid as the defining figure of formal metamorphoses across literary history, Heyworth opens new possibilities for imagining literary history as a history of literary form.” — Jennifer Summit, Stanford University

ISBN: 978-0-268-03106-0
376 pages
Publication Year: 2009

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Gregory Heyworth is associate professor of English at the University of Mississippi.

“Heyworth has written a sophisticated study of the importance of Ovidian form in the poetics and politics of medieval and Renaissance romance . . . [Heyworth] demonstrates one of Ovid’s central attributes: he was an expert historian of culture and the ways in which individuals desired culture to exist. . . . Heyworth’s choice of primary texts works well with his argument, and his theoretical skills are evident throughout. All six chapters are well written, but chapter 3 is a revelation; in it, Heyworth magisterially examines Ovidian notions of the politics of marriage in the Canterbury Tales, particularly ‘The Knight’s Tale’.” — Choice

“There is much to savor in this excellent volume. With laudable elegance and lexical sophistication, Gregory Heyworth’s unique, comparative study soars with ease across the landscape of cultural history in order to bring forth the ‘monolithic’ Ovidian influence on romance form in a selection of noteworthy medieval and Renaissance authors. With exceptional agility, Heyworth’s volume captures the powerful resonance of the Latin Poet’s voice through the ages. . .” — Parergon

Desiring Bodies traces the romance from Marie de France to Milton. . . . Heyworth’s framework produces elegant readings that are persuasive in illustrating that Ovid’s own political context should be brought to the fore more often in considerations of his influence on later literature, as it can illuminate later political contexts and ironic/satirical content, despite the textual and historical mediation of the Metamorphoses and other works.” — Speculum

“From critical and theoretical standpoints, this is an important study of the rich reception of Ovid in the premodern period. It not only complements the scholarship on this topic, but expands it precisely by its theoretical sophistications. . . .This book enriches the field of theoretical approaches to early modern Ovidian discourses by demonstrating how theories of social dynamics help formulate approaches to poetic creations within a cultural and political sphere.” — Sixteenth Century Journal

“The three centerpieces of Heyworth’s accomplishment—which itself defies the paraphrasing rhetoric of the book-review genre—are the intellectual contextualizations of the works he studies, the dramatic and detailed engagement with Ovidian love, bodies, forms, polity, and ‘culture,’ and the old-school, detailed close reading of the poets’ words and stories.” — Studies in the Age of Chaucer

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P03310

Piers Plowman and the Poetics of Enigma

Riddles, Rhetoric, and Theology

Curtis A. Gruenler

P03262

Michael Psellos on Literature and Art

A Byzantine Perspective on Aesthetics

Michael Psellos
Edited by Charles Barber and Stratis Papaioannou

P00614

Creation as Emanation

The Origin of Diversity in Albert the Great’s On the Causes and the Procession of the Universe

Thérèse Bonin

Desiring Bodies

Ovidian Romance and the Cult of Form

Gregory Heyworth

 Desiring Bodies: Ovidian Romance and the Cult of Form
Paper Edition

Gregory Heyworth’s Desiring Bodies considers the physical body and its relationship to poetic and corporate bodies in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Beginning in the odd contest between body and form in the first sentence of Ovid’s protean Metamorphoses, Heyworth identifies these concepts as structuring principles of civic and poetic unity and pursues their consequences as refracted through a series of romances, some typical of the genre, some problematically so.

Bodies, in Ovidian romance, are the objects of human desire to possess, to recover, to form, or to violate. Part 1 examines this desire as both a literal and socio-political phenomenon through readings of Marie de France’s Lais, Chrétien de Troyes’ Cligès and Perceval, and Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, texts variously expressing social, economic, and political culture in romance. In part 2, Heyworth is concerned with missing or absent bodies in Petrarch’s Rime sparse, Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, and Milton’s Paradise Lost and the generic rupture they cause in lyric, tragedy, and epic. Throughout, Heyworth draws on social theorists such as Kant, Weber, Simmel, and Elias to explore the connection between social and literary form.

The first comparative, diachronic study of romance form in many years, Desiring Bodies is a persuasive and important cultural history that demonstrates Ovid’s pervasive influence not only on the poetics but on the politics of the medieval and early modern Western tradition.

Gregory Heyworth’s Desiring Bodies: Ovidian Romance and the Cult of Form is a wide-ranging, impressively learned, first-rate study with a provocative and weighty central argument.” — Monika Otter, Dartmouth College

Desiring Bodies answers the question that might dog Comparative Literature as a discipline (i.e. “so what?”). In a bravura display of cultural and linguistic range, Heyworth turns his own supple, Ovidian intelligence to Ovidian irruptions from within the civilizing project of romance. Heyworth writes with intense literary inwardness, adroitly turned learning, and pitch-perfect prose.” — James Simpson, Harvard University

“Gregory Heyworth’s Desiring Bodies is a highly original study. It is also very daring—breathtakingly so, at times—in its deep engagement with major canonical writers and texts of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, from twelfth-century Latin comedy to Milton’s Paradise Lost. His remarkable essay is achieved within a stimulating cultural and artistic exegesis of a single Ovidian line in which Heyworth finds his own large subject—the famous first line of the Metamorphoses, in which the poet announces the intention to tell ‘of forms changed into new bodies.’ ” — John Fleming, Princeton University

“Ambitious in its aims, convincing in its arguments, and frequently surprising in its readings, Desiring Bodies asks us to reconsider how literary works both respond to and adapt the remains of the literary past. By establishing Ovid as the defining figure of formal metamorphoses across literary history, Heyworth opens new possibilities for imagining literary history as a history of literary form.” — Jennifer Summit, Stanford University

ISBN: 978-0-268-03106-0

376 pages

“Heyworth has written a sophisticated study of the importance of Ovidian form in the poetics and politics of medieval and Renaissance romance . . . [Heyworth] demonstrates one of Ovid’s central attributes: he was an expert historian of culture and the ways in which individuals desired culture to exist. . . . Heyworth’s choice of primary texts works well with his argument, and his theoretical skills are evident throughout. All six chapters are well written, but chapter 3 is a revelation; in it, Heyworth magisterially examines Ovidian notions of the politics of marriage in the Canterbury Tales, particularly ‘The Knight’s Tale’.” — Choice

“There is much to savor in this excellent volume. With laudable elegance and lexical sophistication, Gregory Heyworth’s unique, comparative study soars with ease across the landscape of cultural history in order to bring forth the ‘monolithic’ Ovidian influence on romance form in a selection of noteworthy medieval and Renaissance authors. With exceptional agility, Heyworth’s volume captures the powerful resonance of the Latin Poet’s voice through the ages. . .” — Parergon

Desiring Bodies traces the romance from Marie de France to Milton. . . . Heyworth’s framework produces elegant readings that are persuasive in illustrating that Ovid’s own political context should be brought to the fore more often in considerations of his influence on later literature, as it can illuminate later political contexts and ironic/satirical content, despite the textual and historical mediation of the Metamorphoses and other works.” — Speculum

“From critical and theoretical standpoints, this is an important study of the rich reception of Ovid in the premodern period. It not only complements the scholarship on this topic, but expands it precisely by its theoretical sophistications. . . .This book enriches the field of theoretical approaches to early modern Ovidian discourses by demonstrating how theories of social dynamics help formulate approaches to poetic creations within a cultural and political sphere.” — Sixteenth Century Journal

“The three centerpieces of Heyworth’s accomplishment—which itself defies the paraphrasing rhetoric of the book-review genre—are the intellectual contextualizations of the works he studies, the dramatic and detailed engagement with Ovidian love, bodies, forms, polity, and ‘culture,’ and the old-school, detailed close reading of the poets’ words and stories.” — Studies in the Age of Chaucer

Selected as a Choice Outstanding Academic Title for 2010