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Seventeenth-Century European Drawings in Midwestern Collections

Seventeenth-Century European Drawings in Midwestern Collections

The Age of Bernini, Rembrandt, and Poussin

Edited by Shelley Perlove and George S. Keyes

Seventeenth-Century European Drawings in Midwestern Collections: The Age of Bernini, Rembrandt, and Poussin, the result of an ambitious project sponsored by the Midwest Art History Society, with additional generous support from the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, brings together nearly two hundred treasures of the Baroque age from museum collections throughout the Midwest. The volume presents a fascinating and representative selection of Italian, Dutch, Flemish, and French drawings in Midwestern repositories, offering new insights on many of these works of art. Many are relatively unknown, and some have never before been published.

Authored by major scholars in the field, the catalogue presents each drawing along with a concise description with full scholarly apparatus. Four essays, written by Babette Bohn, George S. Keyes, Kristi A. Nelson, and Alvin L. Clark, Jr., respectively, introduce the Italian, Dutch, Flemish, and French schools. The catalogue’s introductory essay, by Shelley Perlove, places these works within the historical, iconographic, and stylistic currents of seventeenth-century art. The catalogue is designed to have widespread appeal for art historians, curators, artists, collectors, students, and general readers interested in art and cultural history. Moreover, Seventeenth-Century European Drawings in Midwestern Collections highlights the surprising number of institutions throughout the Midwest that have acquired distinguished European drawings from the seventeenth century worthy of full recognition by collectors and connoisseurs.

“An energetic and talented team of the foremost American scholars of seventeenth-century European drawings have combined forces to produce a fascinating compendium for the Midwest Art History Society. In a breathtaking sweep through an abundance of Italian and Dutch drawings, to a more succinct representation of Flemish and French masterpieces, this volume offers a remarkable range of material and subjects from this dramatic era in European history. Interesting works of high quality capture the magic and energy of the Baroque, whether acknowledged gems or lesser-known treasures. In addition to the highly readable entries, there is a fascinating Introduction and overview by Shelley Perlove and rich and rewarding essays on the various schools by Babette Bohn (Italian), George Keyes (Dutch), Kristen Nelson (Flemish) and Alvin Clark (French). There are certain to be delightful surprises for even the most seasoned connoisseur.” — Suzanne Folds McCullagh, Anne Vogt Fuller and Marion Titus Searle Chair and Curator, Department of Prints and Drawings, The Art Institute of Chicago

“This stunning book brings together more than one hundred drawings by major seventeenth-century artists selected from eighteen municipal and university museums in Midwestern collections. It shows how these museums contribute so much to the wealth of old master drawings in American collections. The Dutch, Flemish, French, and Italian drawings are discussed by seven well-known art historians and museum curators, illustrated in color, with additional text figures. The editors visited more than forty Midwestern collections to make their careful selections for this beautifully produced volume.” — Anne-Marie Logan, independent scholar and specialist in northern European drawings

ISBN: 978-0-268-03843-4
320 pages
Publication Year: 2015

Pdf   Download Table of Contents

Shelley Perlove is professor emerita of art history at the University of Michigan.

George Keyes is the former chief curator of the Detroit Institute of Arts.

“This catalogue . . . distills the Midwest’s surprisingly vast and varied inventory down to a manageable 109 drawings . . . this handsomely illustrated and thoroughly researched catalogue does these drawings justice.” — Sixteenth Century Journal

Pdf   Download Excerpt

P01392

Andean Hybrid Baroque

Convergent Cultures in the Churches of Colonial Peru

Gauvin Alexander Bailey

P01354

Sacred Passion

The Art of William Schickel, Second Edition

Gregory Wolfe
Foreword by James Martin, S.J.

Seventeenth-Century European Drawings in Midwestern Collections

The Age of Bernini, Rembrandt, and Poussin


Edited by Shelley Perlove and George S. Keyes

 Seventeenth-Century European Drawings in Midwestern Collections: The Age of Bernini, Rembrandt, and Poussin
Cloth Edition

Seventeenth-Century European Drawings in Midwestern Collections: The Age of Bernini, Rembrandt, and Poussin, the result of an ambitious project sponsored by the Midwest Art History Society, with additional generous support from the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, brings together nearly two hundred treasures of the Baroque age from museum collections throughout the Midwest. The volume presents a fascinating and representative selection of Italian, Dutch, Flemish, and French drawings in Midwestern repositories, offering new insights on many of these works of art. Many are relatively unknown, and some have never before been published.

Authored by major scholars in the field, the catalogue presents each drawing along with a concise description with full scholarly apparatus. Four essays, written by Babette Bohn, George S. Keyes, Kristi A. Nelson, and Alvin L. Clark, Jr., respectively, introduce the Italian, Dutch, Flemish, and French schools. The catalogue’s introductory essay, by Shelley Perlove, places these works within the historical, iconographic, and stylistic currents of seventeenth-century art. The catalogue is designed to have widespread appeal for art historians, curators, artists, collectors, students, and general readers interested in art and cultural history. Moreover, Seventeenth-Century European Drawings in Midwestern Collections highlights the surprising number of institutions throughout the Midwest that have acquired distinguished European drawings from the seventeenth century worthy of full recognition by collectors and connoisseurs.

“An energetic and talented team of the foremost American scholars of seventeenth-century European drawings have combined forces to produce a fascinating compendium for the Midwest Art History Society. In a breathtaking sweep through an abundance of Italian and Dutch drawings, to a more succinct representation of Flemish and French masterpieces, this volume offers a remarkable range of material and subjects from this dramatic era in European history. Interesting works of high quality capture the magic and energy of the Baroque, whether acknowledged gems or lesser-known treasures. In addition to the highly readable entries, there is a fascinating Introduction and overview by Shelley Perlove and rich and rewarding essays on the various schools by Babette Bohn (Italian), George Keyes (Dutch), Kristen Nelson (Flemish) and Alvin Clark (French). There are certain to be delightful surprises for even the most seasoned connoisseur.” — Suzanne Folds McCullagh, Anne Vogt Fuller and Marion Titus Searle Chair and Curator, Department of Prints and Drawings, The Art Institute of Chicago

“This stunning book brings together more than one hundred drawings by major seventeenth-century artists selected from eighteen municipal and university museums in Midwestern collections. It shows how these museums contribute so much to the wealth of old master drawings in American collections. The Dutch, Flemish, French, and Italian drawings are discussed by seven well-known art historians and museum curators, illustrated in color, with additional text figures. The editors visited more than forty Midwestern collections to make their careful selections for this beautifully produced volume.” — Anne-Marie Logan, independent scholar and specialist in northern European drawings

ISBN: 978-0-268-03843-4

320 pages

“This catalogue . . . distills the Midwest’s surprisingly vast and varied inventory down to a manageable 109 drawings . . . this handsomely illustrated and thoroughly researched catalogue does these drawings justice.” — Sixteenth Century Journal