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Medieval Islamic Republic of Letters

The Medieval Islamic Republic of Letters

Arabic Knowledge Construction

Muhsin J. al-Musawi

In The Medieval Islamic Republic of Letters: Arabic Knowledge Construction, Muhsin J. al-Musawi offers a groundbreaking study of literary heritage in the medieval and premodern Islamic period. Al-Musawi challenges the paradigm that considers the period from the fall of Baghdad in 1258 to the collapse of the Ottoman Empire in 1919 as an “Age of Decay” followed by an “Awakening” . His sweeping synthesis debunks this view by carefully documenting a “republic of letters” in the Islamic Near East and South Asia that was vibrant and dynamic, one varying considerably from the generally accepted image of a centuries-long period of intellectual and literary stagnation.

Al-Musawi argues that the massive cultural production of the period was not a random enterprise: instead, it arose due to an emerging and growing body of readers across Islamic lands who needed compendiums, lexicons, and commentaries to engage with scholars and writers. Scholars, too, developed their own networks to respond to each other and to their readers. Rather than addressing only the elite, this culture industry supported a common readership that enlarged the creative space and audience for prose and poetry in standard and colloquial Arabic. Works by craftsmen, artisans, and women appeared side by side with those by distinguished scholars and poets.

Through careful exploration of these networks, The Medieval Islamic Republic of Letters makes use of relevant theoretical frameworks to situate this culture in the ongoing discussion of non-Islamic and European efforts. Thorough, theoretically rigorous, and nuanced, al-Musawi’s book is an original contribution to a range of fields in Arabic and Islamic cultural history of the twelfth to eighteenth centuries.

“Muhsin al-Musawi’s work systematizes a huge body of primary literary texts and current scholarship under a compelling and original thesis. The Medieval Islamic Republic of Letters will be the starting point for a new generation of scholarship on this six-hundred-year ‘republic of letters’ that stretched from India to North Africa.” — Suzanne P. Stetkevych, Sultan Qaboos bin Said Professor of Arabic and Islamic Studies, Georgetown University

“Muhsin al-Musawi, who has already written a number of smaller studies on the pre-modern period of Arabic creativity, now crowns his achievements with a lengthy study that should finally put to rest the orientalist-inspired notion of a ‘period of decadence’ in the Arabo-Islamic cultural heritage. Pointing out the differing esthetic criteria with which previous generations of Western scholars have had such difficulty with engaging and comprehending, Musawi makes telling use of an enormous range of texts in order to analyze and prioritize cultural and literary trends over several medieval centuries and to demonstrate the ways in which successive generations of creative writers and those who commented on their output created a cultural milieu of considerable sophistication. With Musawi’s work, the medieval Arabo-Islamic ‘slough of despond’—to cite Bunyan’s well-known English phrase—can, one hopes, be forever laid to rest.” — Roger Allen, Sascha Jane Patterson Harvie Professor Emeritus of Social Thought and Comparative Ethics, University of Pennsylvania

ISBN: 978-0-268-02044-6
E-ISBN 978-0-268-07483-8
480 pages
Publication Year: 2015

Pdf   Download Table of Contents

Muhsin J. al-Musawi is professor of Arabic and comparative studies at Columbia University.

“The innovation of this study lies not in the choice of its topic—for many have addressed it—but in its robust examination of medieval themes and intellectual ventures, as it were, in conversation with modern and contemporary theories. The book is also pioneering and timely in transcending traditional single-author scholarship on classical and medieval Arabic, while avoiding both atomization and the traditional line-by-line analysis of the Arabic literary tradition. . . . The end result is the best study I have read of medieval Islamic belles lettres and the most cogent critique of ‘the ages of decline’ and Eurocentrism theses in a single blow.” — Journal of the Society for Contemporary Thought and the Islamicate World

“With this work, Muhsin J. al-Musawi . . . has produced perhaps the ultimate expression of his long interest in medieval and pre-modern Islamic culture—a ground-breaking comprehensive and rigorous study of that period’s Arabic literary heritage and ‘cultural capital ,’ in which he unearths a dynamic and diverse ‘Republic of Letters’ . . . . This is a tremendously important work of scholarship that will enthrall many readers around the world, within and outside academia.” — _ Magazine of Modern Arab Literature_

“In The Medieval Islamic Republic of Letters, Muhsin al-Musawi draws on his expertise in the complex eras and literary traditions responsible for producing A Thousand and One Nights in order to interrogate the cultural production of Medieval Islam and demonstrate once and for all how such times have dismissively and erroneously been labeled ‘the Ages of Decline.’ In a patient and in-depth examination of a vast collection of primary and secondary sources, coupled with a thorough and insightful critique of Arabic and European schools of literary thought, and most notably poststructuralist theory, al-Musawi masterfully re-envisions the modalities of literary production that both formed and informed the cultural heritage of Medieval Islam.” — al-Hayat Newspaper

“Muhsin al-Musawi’s The Medieval Islamic Republic of Letters is above all, a response to contemporary theories of modernity and modernism in all their various amnesias toward world literary history. . . . The end result is the best study I have read of medieval Islamic belles lettres and the most cogent critique of “the ages of decline” and Eurocentrism theses in a single blow.” — SCTIW Review

Pdf   Download Excerpt

P03218

Hunt in Arabic Poetry

From Heroic to Lyric to Metapoetic

Jaroslav Stetkevych

P01451

Early Modern Dialogue with Islam

Antonio de Sosa’s Topography of Algiers (1612)


Edited with an Introduction by María Antonia Garcés
Translated by Diana de Armas Wilson

P01270

Arabic Literary Salons in the Islamic Middle Ages

Poetry, Public Performance, and the Presentation of the Past

Samer M. Ali

The Medieval Islamic Republic of Letters

Arabic Knowledge Construction

Muhsin J. al-Musawi

The Medieval Islamic Republic of Letters: Arabic Knowledge Construction
Paper Edition
PDF
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In The Medieval Islamic Republic of Letters: Arabic Knowledge Construction, Muhsin J. al-Musawi offers a groundbreaking study of literary heritage in the medieval and premodern Islamic period. Al-Musawi challenges the paradigm that considers the period from the fall of Baghdad in 1258 to the collapse of the Ottoman Empire in 1919 as an “Age of Decay” followed by an “Awakening” . His sweeping synthesis debunks this view by carefully documenting a “republic of letters” in the Islamic Near East and South Asia that was vibrant and dynamic, one varying considerably from the generally accepted image of a centuries-long period of intellectual and literary stagnation.

Al-Musawi argues that the massive cultural production of the period was not a random enterprise: instead, it arose due to an emerging and growing body of readers across Islamic lands who needed compendiums, lexicons, and commentaries to engage with scholars and writers. Scholars, too, developed their own networks to respond to each other and to their readers. Rather than addressing only the elite, this culture industry supported a common readership that enlarged the creative space and audience for prose and poetry in standard and colloquial Arabic. Works by craftsmen, artisans, and women appeared side by side with those by distinguished scholars and poets.

Through careful exploration of these networks, The Medieval Islamic Republic of Letters makes use of relevant theoretical frameworks to situate this culture in the ongoing discussion of non-Islamic and European efforts. Thorough, theoretically rigorous, and nuanced, al-Musawi’s book is an original contribution to a range of fields in Arabic and Islamic cultural history of the twelfth to eighteenth centuries.

“Muhsin al-Musawi’s work systematizes a huge body of primary literary texts and current scholarship under a compelling and original thesis. The Medieval Islamic Republic of Letters will be the starting point for a new generation of scholarship on this six-hundred-year ‘republic of letters’ that stretched from India to North Africa.” — Suzanne P. Stetkevych, Sultan Qaboos bin Said Professor of Arabic and Islamic Studies, Georgetown University

“Muhsin al-Musawi, who has already written a number of smaller studies on the pre-modern period of Arabic creativity, now crowns his achievements with a lengthy study that should finally put to rest the orientalist-inspired notion of a ‘period of decadence’ in the Arabo-Islamic cultural heritage. Pointing out the differing esthetic criteria with which previous generations of Western scholars have had such difficulty with engaging and comprehending, Musawi makes telling use of an enormous range of texts in order to analyze and prioritize cultural and literary trends over several medieval centuries and to demonstrate the ways in which successive generations of creative writers and those who commented on their output created a cultural milieu of considerable sophistication. With Musawi’s work, the medieval Arabo-Islamic ‘slough of despond’—to cite Bunyan’s well-known English phrase—can, one hopes, be forever laid to rest.” — Roger Allen, Sascha Jane Patterson Harvie Professor Emeritus of Social Thought and Comparative Ethics, University of Pennsylvania

ISBN: 978-0-268-02044-6

480 pages

“The innovation of this study lies not in the choice of its topic—for many have addressed it—but in its robust examination of medieval themes and intellectual ventures, as it were, in conversation with modern and contemporary theories. The book is also pioneering and timely in transcending traditional single-author scholarship on classical and medieval Arabic, while avoiding both atomization and the traditional line-by-line analysis of the Arabic literary tradition. . . . The end result is the best study I have read of medieval Islamic belles lettres and the most cogent critique of ‘the ages of decline’ and Eurocentrism theses in a single blow.” — Journal of the Society for Contemporary Thought and the Islamicate World

“With this work, Muhsin J. al-Musawi . . . has produced perhaps the ultimate expression of his long interest in medieval and pre-modern Islamic culture—a ground-breaking comprehensive and rigorous study of that period’s Arabic literary heritage and ‘cultural capital ,’ in which he unearths a dynamic and diverse ‘Republic of Letters’ . . . . This is a tremendously important work of scholarship that will enthrall many readers around the world, within and outside academia.” — _ Magazine of Modern Arab Literature_

“In The Medieval Islamic Republic of Letters, Muhsin al-Musawi draws on his expertise in the complex eras and literary traditions responsible for producing A Thousand and One Nights in order to interrogate the cultural production of Medieval Islam and demonstrate once and for all how such times have dismissively and erroneously been labeled ‘the Ages of Decline.’ In a patient and in-depth examination of a vast collection of primary and secondary sources, coupled with a thorough and insightful critique of Arabic and European schools of literary thought, and most notably poststructuralist theory, al-Musawi masterfully re-envisions the modalities of literary production that both formed and informed the cultural heritage of Medieval Islam.” — al-Hayat Newspaper

“Muhsin al-Musawi’s The Medieval Islamic Republic of Letters is above all, a response to contemporary theories of modernity and modernism in all their various amnesias toward world literary history. . . . The end result is the best study I have read of medieval Islamic belles lettres and the most cogent critique of “the ages of decline” and Eurocentrism theses in a single blow.” — SCTIW Review