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Religious Responses to Violence

Religious Responses to Violence

Human Rights in Latin America Past and Present

Edited by Alexander Wilde

During the past half century, Latin America has evolved from a region of political instability and frequent dictatorships into one of elected governments. Although its societies and economies have undergone sweeping changes, high levels of violence have remained a persistent problem. Religious Responses to Violence: Human Rights in Latin America Past and Present offers rich resources to understand how religion has perceived and addressed different forms of violence, from the political and state violence of the 1970s and 1980s to the drug traffickers and youth gangs of today. The contributors offer many fresh insights into contemporary criminal violence and reconsider past interpretations of political violence, liberation theology, and human rights in light of new questions and evidence.

In contrast to many other studies of violence, this book explores its moral dimensions—up close in lived experience—and the real consequences of human agency. Alexander Wilde provides a thoughtful substantive introduction, followed by thematic chapters on “rights,” “violence,” and case studies of ten countries throughout the region. The book breaks new ground examining common responses as well as differences between Catholic and Evangelical pastoral accompaniment. These new studies focus on the specifically religious character of their responses—how they relate their mission and faith to violence in different contexts—to better understand how and why they have taken action.

Contributors: Alexander Wilde, Daniel H. Levine, Robert Albro, Patrick William Kelly, Virginia Garrard-Burnett, María Soledad Catoggio, Gustavo Morello, S.J., Rafael Mafei Rabelo Queiroz, Elyssa Pachico, Javier Arellano-Yanguas, Winifred Tate, Robert Brenneman, Andrew Johnson, Amelia Frank-Vitale, and Kimberly Theidon.

“This book makes an important and original contribution to the fields of religion and politics and to the study of human rights and violence in contemporary Latin America. Religion is treated seriously, by authors who really understand it. The book also brings fresh research and a long view to bear on its examination of civil violence and rights. Scholars and students in a range of disciplines—history, anthropology, sociology, political science, and religion—will find this book of great value.” — Frances Hagopian, Harvard University

ISBN: 978-0-268-04431-2
E-ISBN 978-0-268-09676-2
520 pages
Publication Year: 2015

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Alexander Wilde is research scholar in residence at the Center for Latin American and Latino Studies, American University. He is co-editor (with Scott Mainwaring) of The Progressive Church in Latin America (University of Notre Dame Press, 1989).

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Religious Responses to Violence

Human Rights in Latin America Past and Present


Edited by Alexander Wilde

 Religious Responses to Violence: Human Rights in Latin America Past and Present
Paper Edition
PDF
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During the past half century, Latin America has evolved from a region of political instability and frequent dictatorships into one of elected governments. Although its societies and economies have undergone sweeping changes, high levels of violence have remained a persistent problem. Religious Responses to Violence: Human Rights in Latin America Past and Present offers rich resources to understand how religion has perceived and addressed different forms of violence, from the political and state violence of the 1970s and 1980s to the drug traffickers and youth gangs of today. The contributors offer many fresh insights into contemporary criminal violence and reconsider past interpretations of political violence, liberation theology, and human rights in light of new questions and evidence.

In contrast to many other studies of violence, this book explores its moral dimensions—up close in lived experience—and the real consequences of human agency. Alexander Wilde provides a thoughtful substantive introduction, followed by thematic chapters on “rights,” “violence,” and case studies of ten countries throughout the region. The book breaks new ground examining common responses as well as differences between Catholic and Evangelical pastoral accompaniment. These new studies focus on the specifically religious character of their responses—how they relate their mission and faith to violence in different contexts—to better understand how and why they have taken action.

Contributors: Alexander Wilde, Daniel H. Levine, Robert Albro, Patrick William Kelly, Virginia Garrard-Burnett, María Soledad Catoggio, Gustavo Morello, S.J., Rafael Mafei Rabelo Queiroz, Elyssa Pachico, Javier Arellano-Yanguas, Winifred Tate, Robert Brenneman, Andrew Johnson, Amelia Frank-Vitale, and Kimberly Theidon.

“This book makes an important and original contribution to the fields of religion and politics and to the study of human rights and violence in contemporary Latin America. Religion is treated seriously, by authors who really understand it. The book also brings fresh research and a long view to bear on its examination of civil violence and rights. Scholars and students in a range of disciplines—history, anthropology, sociology, political science, and religion—will find this book of great value.” — Frances Hagopian, Harvard University

ISBN: 978-0-268-04431-2

520 pages

Kellogg Institute Series on Democracy and Development