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Mathematical Disquisitions

Mathematical Disquisitions

The Booklet of Theses Immortalized by Galileo

Christopher M. Graney

Mathematical Disquisitions: The Booklet of Theses Immortalized by Galileo offers a new English translation of the 1614 Disquisitiones Mathematicae, which Johann Georg Locher wrote under the guidance of the German Jesuit astronomer Christoph Scheiner. The booklet, an anti-Copernican astronomical work, is of interest in large part because Galileo Galilei, who came into conflict with Scheiner over the discovery of sunspots, devoted numerous pages within his famous 1632 Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems—Ptolemaic and Copernican to ridiculing Disquisitiones. The brief text (the original was approximately one hundred pages) is heavily illustrated with dozens of original figures, making it an accessible example of “geocentric astronomy in the wake of the telescope.”

The treatise provides valuable insight into the astronomical debates of the seventeenth century, a time when the question of the Earth’s motion was still very much in flux. Whereas Galileo’s works are readily available, there are far fewer translations of works arguing the other side. Christopher Graney’s translation focuses on the mathematical and astronomical core of Locher’s work and is suitable for undergraduate students in courses on the history of science, philosophy of science, astronomy, and physics.

“Christopher Graney has translated foreign terms and concepts in efficient, modern ways, often trimming from them the complicated metaphysical and rhetorical context. Many of Graney’s notes explain mathematical concepts and astronomical phenomena in reference to what astronomers understand today, which will make the text more digestible to an audience familiar with and interested in modern astronomy. The text offers a nice counterbalance to the standard canon of Galileo readings students encounter.” — Darin Hayton, Haverford College

“This well annotated and widely accessible translation of Johann Georg Locher’s 1614 Mathematical Disquisitions makes a forgotten text at the heart of the Galileo Affair newly available to scholars and students alike. By bringing the subtlety and complexity of Locher’s anti-Coperincan positions into view again, Christopher Graney adds enormously to our understanding of the historical complexities and contingencies at the root of this foundational debate in the history of science.” — J. B. Shank, University of Minnesota

ISBN: 978-0-268-10241-8
176 pages
Publication Year: 2017

Christopher M. Graney is professor of physics at Jefferson Community & Technical College. He is the author of Setting Aside All Authority: Giovanni Battista Riccioli and the Science against Copernicus in the Age of Galileo (University of Notre Dame Press, 2015).

P03169

Setting Aside All Authority

Giovanni Battista Riccioli and the Science against Copernicus in the Age of Galileo

Christopher M. Graney

P03169

Setting Aside All Authority

Giovanni Battista Riccioli and the Science against Copernicus in the Age of Galileo

Christopher M. Graney

Mathematical Disquisitions

The Booklet of Theses Immortalized by Galileo

Christopher M. Graney

 Mathematical Disquisitions: The Booklet of Theses Immortalized by Galileo
Cloth Edition
Paper Edition

Mathematical Disquisitions: The Booklet of Theses Immortalized by Galileo offers a new English translation of the 1614 Disquisitiones Mathematicae, which Johann Georg Locher wrote under the guidance of the German Jesuit astronomer Christoph Scheiner. The booklet, an anti-Copernican astronomical work, is of interest in large part because Galileo Galilei, who came into conflict with Scheiner over the discovery of sunspots, devoted numerous pages within his famous 1632 Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems—Ptolemaic and Copernican to ridiculing Disquisitiones. The brief text (the original was approximately one hundred pages) is heavily illustrated with dozens of original figures, making it an accessible example of “geocentric astronomy in the wake of the telescope.”

The treatise provides valuable insight into the astronomical debates of the seventeenth century, a time when the question of the Earth’s motion was still very much in flux. Whereas Galileo’s works are readily available, there are far fewer translations of works arguing the other side. Christopher Graney’s translation focuses on the mathematical and astronomical core of Locher’s work and is suitable for undergraduate students in courses on the history of science, philosophy of science, astronomy, and physics.

“Christopher Graney has translated foreign terms and concepts in efficient, modern ways, often trimming from them the complicated metaphysical and rhetorical context. Many of Graney’s notes explain mathematical concepts and astronomical phenomena in reference to what astronomers understand today, which will make the text more digestible to an audience familiar with and interested in modern astronomy. The text offers a nice counterbalance to the standard canon of Galileo readings students encounter.” — Darin Hayton, Haverford College

“This well annotated and widely accessible translation of Johann Georg Locher’s 1614 Mathematical Disquisitions makes a forgotten text at the heart of the Galileo Affair newly available to scholars and students alike. By bringing the subtlety and complexity of Locher’s anti-Coperincan positions into view again, Christopher Graney adds enormously to our understanding of the historical complexities and contingencies at the root of this foundational debate in the history of science.” — J. B. Shank, University of Minnesota

ISBN: 978-0-268-10241-8

176 pages